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1  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Psalm 94: 1-11 The Revised Grail Psalms on: June 14, 2015, 09:58:38 AM
God wants us to pray for those who wrong us.
When I see what is happening in parts of the Middle East,
I am tempted to pray as the psalmist.


Indeed.


N.
2  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Devotions, Venerated Images & Local Customs of the Philippines on: June 06, 2015, 01:00:56 PM
On a personal note, when me and the family visited the Basilica in Cebu, I have found a surge of spiritual comfort and interior peace, and at the same time, a great and profound feeling of being privileged to see and to pray before that image of which Juan Camus found in a burned hut. The image still exudes the sanctity that befits such sacred treasure even until now.

N.
3  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Devotions, Venerated Images & Local Customs of the Philippines on: June 06, 2015, 12:55:50 PM
The story of the Santo Niño de Cebu


The image of the Santo Niño is kept in the Santo Nino Chapel of the Basilica Minore del Santo Niño de Cebu. It is considered the oldest religious relic in the Philippines.

In April 1521, Ferdinand Magellan, in the service of Charles V of Spain, arrived in Cebu during his voyage to find a westward route to the Indies. He persuaded Rajah Humabon and his chief wife Humaway, to pledge their allegiance to Spain. They were later baptised into the Catholic faith, taking the Christian names Carlos (after Charles V) and Juana (after Joanna of Castile, his mother).

According to Antonio Pigafetta, Italian chronicler to the Spanish expedition, Ferdinand Magellan handed Pigafetta the image to be given to the Rajah's wife right after the baptismal rite officiated by Padre Pedro Valderrama. It was Pigafetta himself who personally presented the Santo Niño to the newly baptised Queen Juana as a symbol of their new alliance, her newly baptized husband King Carlos, Magellan presented the bust of "Ecce Homo", or the depiction of Christ before Pontius Pilate. He also presented an image of the Virgin Mary to the natives who were baptised after their rulers. Magellan died on 27 April 1521 in the Battle of Mactan. Legends say that after initial efforts by the natives to destroy it, the image was venerated as the animist creator deity Bathala. Many historians consider the facial structure of the statue made from Belgium, where Infant Jesus of Prague statues were also common.

I note that when the Spaniards returned years after Magellan died, they found the tomb of Rajah Humabon with the corpse of the Rajah clutching the bust of the Ecce Homo.

44 years after Magellan's soldiers left, the next Spanish expedition arrived on April 27, 1565, led by Miguel López de Legazpi. He found the natives hostile, fearing retribution for Magellan's death, and the village caught fire in the ensuing conflict. The next day, the Spanish mariner Juan Camus found the image of the Santo Niño in a pine box amidst the ruins of a burnt house.The image, carved from wood and coated with paint, stood 30 centimetres tall, and wore a loose velvet garment, a gilded neck chain and a red woolen hood. A golden globus cruciger or orb was in the left hand, with the right hand slightly raised in benediction.

I note here that when Juan Camus saw the statue, he exclaimed, "¡Amado hijo de Maria, hallado has!" which means, "Beloved Son of Mary! I have found Thee!"

 Camus presented the image to Miguel López de Legazpi and the Augustinian priests; the natives refused to associate it with the gift of Magellan, claiming it had existed there since ancient times. Writer Dr. Resil Mojares wrote that the natives did so for fear that the Spaniards would demand it back. The natives’ version of the origin of the Santo Niño is in the Agipo (stump or driftwood) legend, which states that the statue was caught by a fisherman who chose to get rid of it, only to have it returned with a plentiful harvest.

The native retained the statue as a representation of the highest pagan god, Bathala.

The statue was later taken out for procession, afterwards which Legazpi then ordered the creation of the Confraternity of the Santo Niño de Cebú, appointing Father Andrés de Urdaneta as head superior. Legazpi instituted a fiesta to commemorate the finding of the image, and the original celebration still survives.

The Minor Basilica of Santo Niño (Spanish: Basílica Minore del Santo Niño) was built on the spot where the image was found by Juan Camus. The church was originally made out of bamboo and mangrove palm and claims to be the oldest parish in the Philippines. Pope Paul VI elevated its rank as Minor Basilica on its 400th year anniversary.

  Feast

The feast, locally known as Fiesta Señor, starts on the Thursday after the Solemnity of the Epiphany. Each year, the celebration starts with a dawn procession wherein the replica image of Santo Niño de Cebu is brought down to the streets. It is then followed by the novena masses, which span nine days. On the last day of the novena, another dawn procession is held wherein the image of Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Cebu is brought down from its shrine to the Basilica Minore del Santo Niño de Cebu. After the procession, it will stay for a while in the Basilica. Then, the images of Santo Niño de Cebu and Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Cebu are brought to the National Shrine of St. Joseph in Mandaue City to reunite the church's namesake, forming the Holy Family. This transfer, which is common in fiestas throughout the country, is called Traslación.

On the morning of the vesperas ("eve", i.e., the day before) of the feast, the images of Santo Niño de Cebu and Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Cebu are brought back to Cebu City through a fluvial procession, and upon reaching the Basilica, a reenactment of the first mass and baptism is held. It is then followed by a grand solemn foot procession on the afternoon of the same day. After the procession, a solemn Pontifical Mass is concelebrated by bishops and priests. It is then followed by the grand Sinulog Festival on the following Sunday. The feast officially ends on Friday after the Sinulog Festival by the traditional Hubo (Cebuano, "undress") rite in which the image of Santo Niño de Cebu is stripped of its grand ceremonial vestments, bathed in water laced with perfume and redressed in a simple robe. This rite is done in front of the public.

(Source: Wikipedia)


Commentary in red
4  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Devotions, Venerated Images & Local Customs of the Philippines on: June 06, 2015, 12:46:09 PM
The Rite of Bathing the Infant Jesus of Cebu

The "Hubo" ritual, or the undressing of the Sto. Niño image, takes place five days after the Grand Sinulog Parade held every 3rd Sunday of January.

Hubo is the Cebuano word for "to undress". During the mass, priests ceremonially remove the festival garments of the image, bath the image in water laced with perfume, and don the image with ordinary vestments. According to Catholic tradition, the change of garments to less decorated ones symbolizes spiritual change within a person. The order of removal is as follows:

1)    crown
2)    orb and scepter
3)    bands
4)    cape
5)    tunic
6)    inner clothing
7)    boots

The bathing of the child Jesus also has significant meaning. When the image undergoes bathing, it symbolizes purification and cleansing to "renew ties with God". The water used to wash the image is then referred to as "holy water." However, many devotees try to ascribe the said water with magical and miraculous powers, to the disapproval of priests. According to the clergy, the holy water ought to bring adherents to a spirit of prayer, not heal any ailments and cure diseases automatically.

The new, ordinary garments are also used to elicit prayer. Every piece of clothing is taken to signify an event of Jesus' life, and a prayer is recited for it.

Catholic Cebuanos believe that just as the Sinulog festival closes the Christmas season, the Hubo mass also closes the week-long fiesta and opens the Lenten season. In the past, the Hubo ritual was held behind closed doors by Augustinian friars and select women. After the public learned of the closed ritual, the church finally made the ceremony public in 1990. Any church or parish is permitted to hold the ritual if it wishes to.

(Source: Everything Cebu . Com)

5  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Devotions, Venerated Images & Local Customs of the Philippines on: June 06, 2015, 12:24:41 PM
The story of the Santo Niño de Cebu


The image of the Santo Niño is kept in the Santo Nino Chapel of the Basilica Minore del Santo Niño de Cebu. It is considered the oldest religious relic in the Philippines.

In April 1521, Ferdinand Magellan, in the service of Charles V of Spain, arrived in Cebu during his voyage to find a westward route to the Indies. He persuaded Rajah Humabon and his chief wife Humaway, to pledge their allegiance to Spain. They were later baptised into the Catholic faith, taking the Christian names Carlos (after Charles V) and Juana (after Joanna of Castile, his mother).

According to Antonio Pigafetta, Italian chronicler to the Spanish expedition, Ferdinand Magellan handed Pigafetta the image to be given to the Rajah's wife right after the baptismal rite officiated by Padre Pedro Valderrama. It was Pigafetta himself who personally presented the Santo Niño to the newly baptised Queen Juana as a symbol of their new alliance, her newly baptized husband King Carlos, Magellan presented the bust of "Ecce Homo", or the depiction of Christ before Pontius Pilate. He also presented an image of the Virgin Mary to the natives who were baptised after their rulers. Magellan died on 27 April 1521 in the Battle of Mactan. Legends say that after initial efforts by the natives to destroy it, the image was venerated as the animist creator deity Bathala. Many historians consider the facial structure of the statue made from Belgium, where Infant Jesus of Prague statues were also common.

44 years after Magellan's soldiers left, the next Spanish expedition arrived on April 27, 1565, led by Miguel López de Legazpi. He found the natives hostile, fearing retribution for Magellan's death, and the village caught fire in the ensuing conflict. The next day, the Spanish mariner Juan Camus found the image of the Santo Niño in a pine box amidst the ruins of a burnt house.The image, carved from wood and coated with paint, stood 30 centimetres tall, and wore a loose velvet garment, a gilded neck chain and a red woolen hood. A golden globus cruciger or orb was in the left hand, with the right hand slightly raised in benediction. Camus presented the image to Miguel López de Legazpi and the Augustinian priests; the natives refused to associate it with the gift of Magellan, claiming it had existed there since ancient times. Writer Dr. Resil Mojares wrote that the natives did so for fear that the Spaniards would demand it back. The natives’ version of the origin of the Santo Niño is in the Agipo (stump or driftwood) legend, which states that the statue was caught by a fisherman who chose to get rid of it, only to have it returned with a plentiful harvest.

The statue was later taken out for procession, afterwards which Legazpi then ordered the creation of the Confraternity of the Santo Niño de Cebú, appointing Father Andrés de Urdaneta as head superior. Legazpi instituted a fiesta to commemorate the finding of the image, and the original celebration still survives.

The Minor Basilica of Santo Niño (Spanish: Basílica Minore del Santo Niño) was built on the spot where the image was found by Juan Camus. The church was originally made out of bamboo and mangrove palm and claims to be the oldest parish in the Philippines. Pope Paul VI elevated its rank as Minor Basilica on its 400th year anniversary.

  Feast

The feast, locally known as Fiesta Señor, starts on the Thursday after the Solemnity of the Epiphany. Each year, the celebration starts with a dawn procession wherein the replica image of Santo Niño de Cebu is brought down to the streets. It is then followed by the novena masses, which span nine days. On the last day of the novena, another dawn procession is held wherein the image of Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Cebu is brought down from its shrine to the Basilica Minore del Santo Niño de Cebu. After the procession, it will stay for a while in the Basilica. Then, the images of Santo Niño de Cebu and Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Cebu are brought to the National Shrine of St. Joseph in Mandaue City to reunite the church's namesake, forming the Holy Family. This transfer, which is common in fiestas throughout the country, is called Traslación.

On the morning of the vesperas ("eve", i.e., the day before) of the feast, the images of Santo Niño de Cebu and Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Cebu are brought back to Cebu City through a fluvial procession, and upon reaching the Basilica, a reenactment of the first mass and baptism is held. It is then followed by a grand solemn foot procession on the afternoon of the same day. After the procession, a solemn Pontifical Mass is concelebrated by bishops and priests. It is then followed by the grand Sinulog Festival on the following Sunday. The feast officially ends on Friday after the Sinulog Festival by the traditional Hubo (Cebuano, "undress") rite in which the image of Santo Niño de Cebu is stripped of its grand ceremonial vestments, bathed in water laced with perfume and redressed in a simple robe. This rite is done in front of the public.

(Source: Wikipedia)
6  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Devotions, Venerated Images & Local Customs of the Philippines on: June 05, 2015, 12:45:54 PM
I enjoyed my little trip to the Philippines years ago.  Cheesy

Where? In Manila or in Cebu?

The Churches of Manila shall be part of our discussion too in the coming weeks  Smiley.

Thank you for this topic!  Devotions are a Catholic treasure.

You're welcome Smiley.

N.
7  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Devotions, Venerated Images & Local Customs of the Philippines on: June 04, 2015, 10:46:15 AM
Also, take note that this is not meant to be too scholarly and detailed. This is merely a sharing by someone who has an interest, nay, an obsession (!) in all things Catholic and Hispano-Filipino.


N.
8  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Devotions, Venerated Images & Local Customs of the Philippines on: June 04, 2015, 10:43:10 AM
In a few moments after the intermission we will discuss the folowing:

-The 1521 Magellan Expedition, The Devotion to the Santo Niño de Cebu (and later devotions to the Infant Christ in other places and titles)

- Rajah Humabar, Hara Amihan, Cali Pulaco and Rajah Tupaz

- Juan de Camus and the rediscovery of the Infant Child Jesus, and the flowering of Christianity in the Philippines.

N.
9  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Devotions, Venerated Images & Local Customs of the Philippines on: June 04, 2015, 10:36:05 AM
The beauty of these devotions is that at one point in time (and probably in some cases even today) these are practiced throughout the former Spanish territories and Spain herself, but through passage of time, these customs have been forgotten in those areas (with the exception of probably some if not many).


Other traditions, on the other hand, are fairly practiced in the Islands alone, while the other practices are shared by the Islands along the rest of the Catholic world, with local variation as is common to countries.


N.
10  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Devotions, Venerated Images & Local Customs of the Philippines on: June 04, 2015, 10:29:37 AM
I am going to fill this thread with news, information and articles about Catholic devotions from Las Islas Filipinas.b Smiley


Stay tuned.


N.
11  Forums / Saints' & Spiritual Life General Discussion / Re: Christ Child Pichincha, Statue in Quito on: May 23, 2015, 06:11:19 AM
He seemed to be reminiscent to the Sto. Niño de la Pasion to me.

N.
12  Forums / Saints' & Spiritual Life General Discussion / Uncion Sagrada on: May 23, 2015, 06:07:32 AM

A little bit of explanation.

"Uncion Sagrada" (lit. "Sacred Unction") is defined as a characteristic of certain religious images to convey a sense ofthe sacred and would oftentimes even urge the one looking at said image to kneel, venerate and pray in front of said image.

Did anyone had ever experienced a thing with regards to a certain image of Our Lord, Our Lady and the Saints? Which image? How did you feel when seeing said image?

Please do show a picture of the image.

N.
13  Forums / Prayer Requests / Re: My Vow to St. Benedict on: May 04, 2015, 04:43:12 PM
Well, today is the day that I will be getting on the hospital in order to have laparascopy (sp?). Please pray through the intercession of St. Benedict, St. Luke, St. Jude and especially of Our Lady that this would succesfully remove my gallstones (without causing me much pain.

Thank You!

N.
14  Forums / Prayer Requests / My Vow to St. Benedict on: April 30, 2015, 05:20:05 PM
I have promised Saint Benedict that  if my operation next week would be as painless, quick and easy, I  promised him that I will be an Oblate and  I am to commission a wooden image of him.

It would look like this:

(Go to the gallery and see  "Saint Benedict 1")

But instead  of being carved in the round, it  will have a  mannequin body so that  it could be posed easily for being clothed.  Also,  instead of being brownish  as  in the picture,  it shall be given a fair complexion  (I  would also provide a photo of the same statue above  but with that complexion.

N
15  Forums / Prayer Requests / Re: Please Pray for Me on: April 25, 2015, 11:21:34 PM
O untouchable, and forever blessed, singular and incomparable virgin Mary, Mother of God, most pleasing temple of God, the sacred place of the Holy Ghost, the gate of the kingdom of heaven, by whom next unto God the whole world liveth. Incline, O Mother of Mercy, the ears of thy pity unto my unworthy supplications, and be unto me, a most wretched sinner, a pious helper in all things. O most blessed John, the familiar friend of Christ, which of our same Lord Jesus Christ was chosen a virgin, and among the rest more beloved, above all instructed in the heavenly mysteries, for thou wast made a most worthy apostle and evangelist: thee also I call upon with Mary, mother of our same Saviour, that thou wouldst vouchsafe to afford me thine aid with hers. O ye two celestial jewels, Mary and John. O ye two lights divinely shining before God. Chase away by your bright beams the clouds of my offenses. For ye are those two in whom God the Father through his own Son specially built a house for himself, and in whom God's Son himself because of the merit of most sincere virginity, hanging upon the cross confirmed the privilege of his love, saying thus to the one of you: woman, behold thy son: and then unto the other: behold thy mother. In the sweetness therefore of his most sacred love, through which at that time by our Lord's mouth, as mother and son ye were joined together, I, a most wretched sinner, recommend this day to you two both my body and soul that at all hours and moments, inwardly and outwardly, ye would vouchsafe to be firm guardians, and before God devout intercessors: for I believe firmly and say without any doubt that he who wants to be yours wishes to belong to God, and he who does not want to be yours does not want to belong to God. Whatever ye ask from him ye obtain without delay. Therefore, by this so very influential power of your worthiness, petition I beseech on behalf of me, a sinner, for the deliverance of my body and soul. Procure, I beseech, by your sacred prayers, that the nourishing spirit, the best giver of graces, may vouchsafe to visit my heart and dwell therein, which may thoroughly purge me from all filth of vice, lighten and adorn me with sacred virtues: cause me perfectly to stand, and persevere in the love of God and my neighbor, and after the course of this life the most benign Comforter, greatest bestower of graces, may bring me to the joys of his elect, who with God the coeternal and consubstantial Father liveth and reigneth world without end. Amen.
16  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: The Liturgy of the Hours on: April 03, 2015, 01:37:42 PM
You'd be better off with the traditional breviary. I'll PM you a bit more info.

Unless you use an online version you are going to have to learn how to flip back and forth, which is what all the ribbons are for.

Seconded.

Try either the Roman Breviary of 1962 or the Monastic Diurnal.

Or perhaps start  easy  with the Little Office  of  Our Lady.

N.
17  Forums / Catholic General Discussion / Re: Favourite Hymns on: April 03, 2015, 01:34:31 PM
O Lady set in glory great,
Above the stars in high degree,
That gave him suck with sacred breast,
By providence that formed thee.
By thy fair blossom thou restored,
What lamentable Eve decayed:
That wailing wights might mount the stars,
The heavens' window thou art made.
The gate thou art of the high king,
The port of light that glisters clear,
Since life was given by a maid.
Let freed men show joyful cheer.
Glory be unto thee O Lord,
That born was of the virgin pure.
With the father and holy Ghost,
All ages ever to endure. Amen.
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