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Saints' Discussion Forums  |  Forums  |  Saints' & Spiritual Life General Discussion  |  Topic: Saint of the day and Feast days. 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Saint of the day and Feast days.  (Read 528879 times)
odhiambo
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« Reply #1408 on: January 11, 2012, 05:21:10 AM »

He was hanged, drawn, and quartered on 11 January 1584 at Tyburn, London, England

Hanged! drawn! and quartered!
The ultimate punishment available then in English law for men who had been convicted of High Treason. Women were burned at the stake instead. Sad
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Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1409 on: January 11, 2012, 07:49:21 PM »

'A greedy appetite for food is terminated by satiety and the pleasure of drinking ends when our thirst is quenched. And so it is with the other things. . . But the possession of virtue, once it is solidly achieved, cannot be measured by time nor limited by satiety. Rather, to those who are its disciples it always appears as something ever new and fresh.'

St. Gregory of Nyssa
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'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
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« Reply #1410 on: January 12, 2012, 04:37:10 AM »

12 January

Today is theMemorial of
Saint Marguerite Bourgeoys
Among many other saints.
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Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1411 on: January 12, 2012, 04:43:33 AM »

Marguerite Bourgeoys.
Foundress of the Sisters of the Congregation of Notre-Dame
Marguerite Bourgeoys was born on Good Friday, April 17, 1620. She was born in Troyes, in the province of Champagne (France), and was baptized on the same day in the church of Saint Jean. She was the sixth child in a family of twelve. Her parents were Abraham Bourgeoys and Guillemette Gamier.
When Marguerite was nineteen years old, her mother died.
About one year after her mother’s death, there was an unforgettable occurrence that changed Marguerite’s  life completely. During a procession held on October 7 in honor of Our Lady of the Rosary, her eyes rested on a statue of the Blessed Virgin, and at that very moment she felt called to consecrate herself completely to the service of God.
She registered, at once, as a member of the Congregation of Troyes, an association of young girls devoted to the charitable work of teaching children in the poor districts of the town.
In 1652, she travelled to Canada to tutor the children of the Montreal Garrison.
In 1676, she received approval for her institution from Bishop Laval of Quebec, founded her congregation and obtained a permission to teach throughout Canada. Her sisters of Notre Dame de Montreal received papal approval in 1689.
Marguerite died on January 12, 1700.
She was canonized in 1982 by Pope John Paul II.
Saint Marguerite Bourgeoys,
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Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1412 on: January 13, 2012, 01:52:00 AM »

13 January

Today is the Memorial of
Saint Hilary of Poitiers.
Among many other saints
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Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1413 on: January 13, 2012, 02:00:59 AM »

Saint Hilary of Poitiers.
Bishop and Doctor of the Church.
Hilary was born a pagan. He was the son of a noble Gallo-Roman family in Poitiers, then an important city in France. He was married and had a daughter named Apra (the daughter’s name is listed as Abia in other sources.)
Hilary had many  unanswered questions which paganism did not seem to address. His quest for the truth finally lead him to study Holy Scriptures, and it was the conception of God as portrayed there which led him to seek baptism and conversion, he was an adult by then, aged around 30.
After his conversion to Christianity, Hilary was elected as bishop of his home town, Poitiers. He emerged as the main defender of the Church against the Arians. He was condemned for his stand and exiled to Phrygia in Asia Minor for 4 years by Emperor Constantius II
“While in exile he visited many eastern churches, learning new things about the Church. It was here that he wrote a theological work called "On the Trinity." From this writing St. Hilary's symbol came to be three books and a quill pen” He also wrote "History of Synods."
Eventually Hilary was sent back to Poitiers.
“St. Hilary was known throughout France as a great preacher and author. Martin of Tours was attracted by his sermons, and as a young man came to Poitiers to hear him, remaining for some time as Hilary's disciple”
Apart from His commentaries on the Old and New Testament, particularly the Psalms, his chief works were the two already mentioned above, viz:
De, Trinitate ( On the Trinity) and De Synodis ( On the Synods)
Hilary died in Poitiers on November 1, 367.
He was proclaimed a "Doctor of the Church" in 1851, by Blessed Pope Pius IX
Saint Hilary of Poitiers
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Jesus, Jesus, Jesus!
Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1414 on: January 14, 2012, 08:02:29 AM »

14 January

Today is the Memorial of
Servant of God John the Gardener
Among many other Saints
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Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1415 on: January 14, 2012, 08:06:10 AM »

Servant of God John the Gardener.
John was born of poor parents in Portugal. Orphaned early in life, he spent some years begging from door to door. After finding work in Spain as a shepherd, he shared the little he earned with those even needier than himself.
One day two Franciscans encountered him on a journey. Engaging him in conversation, they took a liking to the simple man and invited him to come and work at their friary in Salamanca. He readily accepted and was assigned to the task of assisting the brothers with gardening duties. A short time later John himself entered the Franciscan Order and lived a life of prayer and meditation, fasting constantly, spending the nights in prayer, still helping the poor. Because of his work in the garden and the flowers he produced for the altar, he became known as "the gardener."

God favored John with the gift of prophecy and the ability to read hearts. Important persons, including princes, came to the humble, ever obedient friar for advice. He so loved everyone that he never wanted to take offense at anything. His advice was that to forgive offenses is an act of penance most pleasing to God.
He predicted the day of his own death: January 11, 1501”
Saint John,
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Jesus, Jesus, Jesus!
Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1416 on: January 14, 2012, 10:43:34 AM »

St John the Gardener, pray for us! He is probably the patron saint for gardeners. Must invoke him when I attempt any gardening!  Cheesy
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« Reply #1417 on: January 15, 2012, 05:26:24 AM »

St John the Gardener, pray for us! He is probably the patron saint for gardeners. Must invoke him when I attempt any gardening!  Cheesy

I am sure he would help you though I did not see his name listed among the Patron Saints of gardens and gardeners. Smiley
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Jesus, Jesus, Jesus!
Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1418 on: January 15, 2012, 05:28:48 AM »

15 January

Today is the Feast day of
Saint Paul the Hermit
Among many other saints
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Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1419 on: January 15, 2012, 05:33:54 AM »

Paul the Hermit.
Paul, also known as Paul the First Hermit and Paul of Thebes, was born in Lower Thebaid, Egypt. He was said to be a well learned and devout man. At the age of 15, he was left an orphan. He grew up to be a wealthy man. It is not clear whether Paul was born in a Christian family, what is clear is that he was a Christian. During the persecution of the Church, under Emperor Trajanus Decius in 250, Paul was forced to hide in the house of a friend.
At the age of 22, he fled to the desert to circumvent a planned denouncement of him as a Christian, by his brother in law. The betrayal by the brother in law was for personal gain; he wanted to gain control of Paul’s property.
Paul took to the eremitical life in the desert like a duck to water. He liked the solitude and remained in the desert for the rest of his very long life in prayer and contemplation.
Where he decided to spend his life, there was a palm tree that provided him with food and clothing, for he ate the fruit and used the leaves to cover himself. There was a brook in the vicinity from which he drank. When the palm tree was no longer able to provided him with food ( reportedly, after 21 years), it is said that a raven began to bring him half a loaf of bread daily!
When Paul was old , he was visited by Saint Anthony who sought him for 3 days in the desert before finding him. That day, the raven reportedly brought a whole loaf instead of the usual half!
Having spent the night in prayer, at the break of dawn, Paul told Anthony that he was about to die and requested to be buried in the cloak given to Anthony by Saint Athanasius.
Anthony hastened to fetch the cloak; coming back, he found Saint Paul had died. His body was in a kneeling position as if in prayer.
Anthony wrapped Paul in the cloak he had brought and buried him. Legend has it that two lions assisted Anthony in digging the grave!
Saint Paul was aged 113 when he died!
The details of Saint Paul’s life is found in the Vita Pauli writted by Saint Jerome and preserved in both Latin and Greek versions.
Saint Paul is venerated as the Patron of weavers.
Saint Paul,
Pray for us!
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Jesus, Jesus, Jesus!
Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1420 on: January 16, 2012, 01:30:36 AM »

St. John the Gardener.. St. Paul the Hermit.. to fine and memorable saints aren't they!

'The blessed Paul had already lived on earth the life of heaven for a hundred and thirteen years, and Antony at the age of ninety was dwelling in another place of solitude (as he himself was wont to declare), when the thought occurred to the latter, that no monk more perfect than himself had settled in the desert. However, in the stillness of the night it was revealed to him that there was farther in the desert a much better man than he, and that he ought to go and visit him. . .

[And after a journey, described by St. Jerome, they at last meet.]

After the sacred kiss Paul sat down and thus began to address Antony. “Behold the man whom you have sought with so much toil, his limbs decayed with age, his gray hairs unkempt. You see before you a man who ere long will be dust. But love endures all things. Tell me therefore, I pray you, how fares the human race? Are new homes springing up in the ancient cities? What government directs the world? Are there still some remaining for the demons to carry away by their delusions?” Thus conversing they noticed with wonder a raven which had settled on the bough of a tree, and was then flying gently down till it came and laid a whole loaf of bread before them. They were astonished, and when it had gone, “See,” said Paul, “the Lord truly loving, truly merciful, has sent us a meal. For the last sixty years I have always received half a loaf: but at your coming Christ has doubled his soldier’s rations.”

Accordingly, having returned thanks to the Lord, they sat down together on the brink of the glassy spring. At this point a dispute arose as to who should break the bread, and nearly the whole day until eventide was spent in the discussion. Paul urged in support of his view the rites of hospitality, Antony pleaded age. At length it was arranged that each should seize the loaf on the side nearest to himself, pull towards him, and keep for his own the part left in his hands. Then on hands and knees they drank a little water from the spring, and offering to God the sacrifice of praise passed the night in vigil. At the return of day the blessed Paul thus spoke to Antony: “I knew long since, brother, that you were dwelling in those parts: long ago God promised you to me for a fellow-servant; but the time of my falling asleep now draws nigh; I have always longed to be dissolved and to be with Christ; my course is finished, and there remains for me a crown of righteousness. Therefore you have been sent by the Lord to lay my poor body in the ground, yea to return earth to earth.”

On hearing this Antony with tears and groans began to pray that he would not desert him, but would take him for a companion on that journey. His friend replied: “You ought not to seek your own, but another man’s good. It is expedient for you to lay aside the burden of the flesh and to follow the Lamb; but it is expedient for the rest of the brethren to be trained by your example. Wherefore be so good as to go and fetch the cloak Bishop Athanasius gave you, to wrap my poor body in.” The blessed Paul asked this favour not because he cared much whether his corpse when it decayed were clothed or naked (why should he indeed, when he had so long worn a garment of palm-leaves stitched together?); but that he might soften his friend’s regrets at 302his decease. Antony was astonished to find Paul had heard of Athanasius and his cloak; and, seeing as it were Christ Himself in him, he mentally worshipped God without venturing to add a single word; then silently weeping he once more kissed his eyes and hands, and set out on his return to the monastery which was afterwards seized by the Saracens. His steps lagged behind his will. Yet, exhausted as he was with fasting and broken by age, his courage proved victorious over his years.

At last wearied and panting for breath he completed his journey and reached his little dwelling. Here he was met by two disciples who had begun to wait upon him in his advanced age. Said they, “Where have you stayed so long, father?” He replied, “Woe to me a sinner! I do not deserve the name of monk. I have seen Elias, I have seen John in the desert, and I have really seen Paul in Paradise.” He then closed his lips, beat upon his breast, and brought out the cloak from his cell. When his disciples asked him to explain the matter somewhat more fully he said, “There is a time to keep silence, and a time to speak.

He then went out, and without taking so much as a morsel of food returned the same way he came, longing for him alone, thirsting to see him, having eyes and thought for none but him. For he was afraid, and the event proved his anticipations correct, that in his absence his friend might yield up his spirit to Christ. And now another day had dawned and a three hours’ journey still remained, when he saw Paul in robes of snowy white ascending on high among the bands of angels, and the choirs of prophets and apostles. Immediately he fell on his face, and threw the coarse sand upon his head, weeping and wailing as he cried, “Why do you cast me from you, Paul? Why go without one farewell? Have you made yourself known so late only to depart so soon?”

The blessed Antony used afterwards to relate that he traversed the rest of the distance at such speed that he flew along like a bird; and not without reason: for on entering the cave he saw the lifeless body in a kneeling attitude, with head erect and hands uplifted. The first thing he did, supposing him to be alive, was to pray by his side. But when he did not hear the sighs which usually come from one in prayer, he fell to kisses and tears, and he then understood that even the dead body of the saint with duteous gestures was praying to God unto whom all things live.

Then having wrapped up the body and carried it forth, all the while chanting hymns and psalms according to the Christian tradition, Antony began to lament that he had no implement for digging the ground. So in a surging sea of thought and pondering many plans he said: “If I return to the monastery, there is a four days’ journey: if I stay here I shall do no good. I will die then, as is fitting, beside Thy warrior, O Christ, and will quickly breathe my last breath. While he turned these things over in his mind, behold, two lions from the recesses of the desert with manes flying on their necks came rushing along. At first he was horrified at the sight, but again turning his thoughts to God, he waited without alarm, as though they were doves that he saw. They came straight to the corpse of the blessed old man and there stopped, fawned upon it and lay down at its feet, roaring aloud as if to make it known that they were mourning in the only way possible to them. Then they began to paw the ground close by, and vie with one another in excavating the sand, until they dug out a place just large enough to hold a man. And immediately, as if demanding a reward for their work, pricking up their ears while they lowered their heads, they came to Antony and began to lick his hands and feet. He perceived that they were begging a blessing from him, and at once with an outburst of praise to Christ that even dumb animals felt His divinity, he said, “Lord, without whose command not a leaf drops from the tree, not a sparrow falls to the ground, grant them what thou knowest to be best.” Then he waved his hand and bade them depart. When they were gone he bent his aged shoulders beneath the burden of the saint’s body, laid it in the grave, covered it with the excavated soil, and raised over it the customary mound. Another day dawned, and then, that the affectionate heir might not be without something belonging to the intestate dead, he took for himself the tunic which after the manner of wicker-work the saint had woven out of palm-leaves. And so returning to the monastery he unfolded everything in order to his disciples, and on the feast-days of Easter and Pentecost he always wore Paul’s tunic.

I may be permitted at the end of this little treatise to ask those who do not know the extent of their possessions, who adorn their homes with marble, who string house to house and field to field, what did this old man in his nakedness ever lack? Your drinking vessels are of precious stones; he satisfied his thirst with the hollow of his hand. Your tunics are of wrought gold; he had not the raiment of the meanest of your slaves. But on the other hand, poor though he was, Paradise is open to him; you with all your gold will be received into Gehenna. He though naked yet kept the robe of Christ; you, clad 303in your silks, have lost the vesture of Christ. Paul lies covered with worthless dust, but will rise again to glory; over you are raised costly tombs, but both you and your wealth are doomed to the burning. Have a care, I pray you, at least have a care for the riches you love. Why are even the grave-clothes of your dead made of gold? Why does not your vaunting cease even amid mourning and tears? Cannot the carcases of rich men decay except in silk?

I beseech you, reader, whoever you may be, to remember Jerome the sinner. He, if God would give him his choice, would much sooner take Paul’s tunic with his merits, than the purple of kings with their punishment.'

St. Jerome
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'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
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« Reply #1421 on: January 16, 2012, 05:52:20 AM »


[And after a journey, described by St. Jerome, they at last meet.]

After the sacred kiss Paul sat down and thus began to address Antony. “Behold the man whom you have sought with so much toil, his limbs decayed with age, his gray hairs unkempt. You see before you a man who ere long will be dust. But love endures all things. Tell me therefore, I pray you, how fares the human race? Are new homes springing up in the ancient cities? What government directs the world? Are there still some remaining for the demons to carry away by their delusions?” Thus conversing they noticed with wonder a raven which had settled on the bough of a tree, and was then flying gently down till it came and laid a whole loaf of bread before them. They were astonished, and when it had gone, “See,” said Paul, “the Lord truly loving, truly merciful, has sent us a meal. For the last sixty years I have always received half a loaf: but at your coming Christ has doubled his soldier’s rations.”
St. Jerome
Truly manna from Heaven Shin.
Manna from Heaven! crucifix
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Jesus, Jesus, Jesus!
Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1422 on: January 16, 2012, 05:53:30 AM »

16 January

Today is the Memorial of
Saint Berard and Companions
Among many other saints
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Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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« Reply #1423 on: January 16, 2012, 05:55:45 AM »

Berard and Companions.
Martyrs
Berard ( Berardus) was a native of Carbio, Italy, a member of the Leopardi family.
He entered the Franciscan Order in 1213. Together with two Franciscan priests, Peter and Odo(Otto), and two lay brothers, Accursio and Adjustus, Berard was sent by Saint Francis to convert the Muslims in 1219.
They were banished from Seville, Spain by the Moors, the Muslim rulers of that era. They went to Morocco. In Morocco, the sultan arrested and beheaded them.
They were canonized in 1481.
From – Our Sunday Visitor’s
Encyclopedia of Saints.
Revised…
Saint Berard and Companions,
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Jesus, Jesus, Jesus!
Inspirational Quotes from the saints:
'If men but knew Thee, O my God!'
St. Ignatius of Loyola
“Late have I loved Thee,
 O Beauty ever ancient, ever new,
 late have I loved Thee!......”
St. Augustine of Hippo
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