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Author Topic: Solemnities, Feasts and Memorial days of the Saints  (Read 50665 times)
James - a humble servant
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« Reply #64 on: February 01, 2016, 09:03:44 AM »

St. Ansgar
(801-865)

The “apostle of the north” (Scandinavia) had enough frustrations to become a saint—and he did. He became a Benedictine at Corbie, France, where he had been educated. Three years later, when the king of Denmark became a convert, Ansgar went to that country for three years of missionary work, without noticeable success. Sweden asked for Christian missionaries, and he went there, suffering capture by pirates and other hardships on the way. Fewer than two years later, he was recalled, to become abbot of New Corbie (Corvey) and bishop of Hamburg. The pope made him legate for the Scandinavian missions. Funds for the northern apostolate stopped with Emperor Louis’s death. After 13 years’ work in Hamburg, Ansgar saw it burned to the ground by invading Northmen; Sweden and Denmark returned to paganism.

He directed new apostolic activities in the North, traveling to Denmark and being instrumental in the conversion of another king. By the strange device of casting lots, the king of Sweden allowed the Christian missionaries to return.

Ansgar’s biographers remark that he was an extraordinary preacher, a humble and ascetical priest. He was devoted to the poor and the sick, imitating the Lord in washing their feet and waiting on them at table. He died peacefully at Bremen, Germany, without achieving his wish to be a martyr.

Sweden became pagan again after his death, and remained so until the coming of missionaries two centuries later.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
James - a humble servant
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« Reply #65 on: February 02, 2016, 11:39:58 AM »

Presentation of the Lord
 
At the end of the fourth century, a woman named Etheria made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. Her journal, discovered in 1887, gives an unprecedented glimpse of liturgical life there. Among the celebrations she describes is the Epiphany (January 6), the observance of Christ’s birth, and the gala procession in honor of his Presentation in the Temple 40 days later—February 15. (Under the Mosaic Law, a woman was ritually “unclean” for 40 days after childbirth, when she was to present herself to the priests and offer sacrifice—her “purification.” Contact with anyone who had brushed against mystery—birth or death—excluded a person from Jewish worship.) This feast emphasizes Jesus’ first appearance in the Temple more than Mary’s purification.

The observance spread throughout the Western Church in the fifth and sixth centuries. Because the Church in the West celebrated Jesus’ birth on December 25, the Presentation was moved to February 2, 40 days after Christmas.

At the beginning of the eighth century, Pope Sergius inaugurated a candlelight procession; at the end of the same century the blessing and distribution of candles which continues to this day became part of the celebration, giving the feast its popular name: Candlemas.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #66 on: February 02, 2016, 01:54:59 PM »

'The time having now come when, according to the law, Mary had to go to the Temple for her purification, and to present Jesus to the divine Father, behold she sets out in company with Joseph. Joseph carries the two turtle-doves that they are to offer to God, and Mary carries her dear Infant: she takes the Lamb of God to offer him to the Almighty, in token of the great sacrifice that this Son should one day accomplish on the cross.

Consider the holy Virgin entering the Temple; she makes an oblation of her Son on the part of the whole human race, and says: Behold, O Eternal Father, Thy beloved only-begotten One, who is Thy Son and mine also; I offer him to Thee as a victim to Thy divine justice, in order to appease Thy wrath against sinners. Accept him, O God of mercy! have pity on our miseries; for the love of this immaculate Lamb do Thou receive men into Thy grace.'

St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori
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'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
James - a humble servant
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« Reply #67 on: February 02, 2016, 02:11:53 PM »

Thanks Brother ! I thought my posting was a little weak on the Presentation. But gives a good insight on the "Candlemas".
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
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« Reply #68 on: February 02, 2016, 02:15:59 PM »

I enjoyed reading it!
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'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
James - a humble servant
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« Reply #69 on: February 06, 2016, 11:42:23 AM »

St. Paul Miki and Companions
(d. 1597)

Nagasaki, Japan, is familiar to Americans as the city on which the second atomic bomb was dropped, immediately killing over 37,000 people. Three and a half centuries before, 26 martyrs of Japan were crucified on a hill, now known as the Holy Mountain, overlooking Nagasaki. Among them were priests, brothers and laymen, Franciscans, Jesuits and members of the Secular Franciscan Order; there were catechists, doctors, simple artisans and servants, old men and innocent children—all united in a common faith and love for Jesus and his Church.

Brother Paul Miki, a Jesuit and a native of Japan, has become the best known among the martyrs of Japan. While hanging upon a cross, Paul Miki preached to the people gathered for the execution: “The sentence of judgment says these men came to Japan from the Philippines, but I did not come from any other country. I am a true Japanese. The only reason for my being killed is that I have taught the doctrine of Christ. I certainly did teach the doctrine of Christ. I thank God it is for this reason I die. I believe that I am telling only the truth before I die. I know you believe me and I want to say to you all once again: Ask Christ to help you to become happy. I obey Christ. After Christ’s example I forgive my persecutors. I do not hate them. I ask God to have pity on all, and I hope my blood will fall on my fellow men as a fruitful rain.”

When missionaries returned to Japan in the 1860s, at first they found no trace of Christianity. But after establishing themselves they found that thousands of Christians lived around Nagasaki and that they had secretly preserved the faith. Beatified in 1627, the martyrs of Japan were finally canonized in 1862.

Comment:
Today a new era has come for the Church in Japan. Although the number of Catholics is not large, the Church is respected and has total religious freedom. The spread of Christianity in the Far East is slow and difficult. Faith such as that of the 26 martyrs is needed today as much as in 1597.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #70 on: February 08, 2016, 11:07:16 AM »

St. Josephine Bakhita
(c. 1868-1947)

For many years, Josephine Bakhita was a slave but her spirit was always free and eventually that spirit prevailed.

Born in Olgossa in the Darfur region of southern Sudan, Josephine was kidnapped at the age of seven, sold into slavery and given the name Bakhita, which means fortunate. She was re-sold several times, finally in 1883 to Callisto Legnani, Italian consul in Khartoum, Sudan.

Two years later he took Josephine to Italy and gave her to his friend Augusto Michieli. Bakhita became babysitter to Mimmina Michieli, whom she accompanied to Venice's Institute of the Catechumens, run by the Canossian Sisters. While Mimmina was being instructed, Josephine felt drawn to the Catholic Church. She was baptized and confirmed in 1890, taking the name Josephine.

When the Michielis returned from Africa and wanted to take Mimmina and Josephine back with them, the future saint refused to go. During the ensuing court case, the Canossian sisters and the patriarch of Venice intervened on Josephine's behalf. The judge concluded that since slavery was illegal in Italy, she had actually been free since 1885.

Josephine entered the Institute of St. Magdalene of Canossa in 1893 and made her profession three years later. In 1902, she was transferred to the city of Schio (northeast of Verona), where she assisted her religious community through cooking, sewing, embroidery and welcoming visitors at the door. She soon became well loved by the children attending the sisters' school and the local citizens. She once said, "Be good, love the Lord, pray for those who do not know Him. What a great grace it is to know God!"

The first steps toward her beatification began in 1959. She was beatified in 1992 and canonized eight years later.

Comment:
Josephine's body was mutilated by those who enslaved her, but they could not touch her inner spirit. Her Baptism set her on an eventual path toward asserting her civic freedom and then service to God's people as a Canossian sister.

She who worked under many "masters" was finally happy to address God as "master" and carry out everything that she believed to be God's will for her.

Quote:

During his homily at her canonization Mass in St. Peter's Square, Pope John Paul II said that in St. Josephine Bakhita, "We find a shining advocate of genuine emancipation. The history of her life inspires not passive acceptance but the firm resolve to work effectively to free girls and women from oppression and violence, and to return them to their dignity in the full exercise of their rights."
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #71 on: February 10, 2016, 03:11:41 PM »

Saint John Eudes       
     
John Eudes was born in 1601 in Ri, Normandy in France.       
On May 26, 1613, John made his First Holy Communion. From that day on, he redoubled his efforts to live as a true Christian.             He obtained his parish priest's permission to receive Holy Eucharist monthly. At that time the practice was to go to confession and receive Holy Communion only on the most significant feasts.   
He died in 1680. His liturgical feast is celebrated on August 19th.
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« Reply #72 on: February 11, 2016, 09:45:28 PM »

'Our wish, our object, our chief preoccupation must be to form Jesus in ourselves, to make His spirit, His devotion, His affections, His desires, and His disposition live and reign there. All our religious exercises should be directed to this end. It is the work which God has given us to do unceasingly.'

St. Jean Eudes

'Get out of the filth of the horrible torrent of this world, the torrent of thorns that is whirling you into the abyss of eternal perdition. . . This torrent is the world, which resembles an impetuous torrent, full of garbage and evil odours, making a lot of noise but flowing swiftly passed, dragging the majority of men into the pit of perdition.'

St. Jean Eudes
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'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
James - a humble servant
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« Reply #73 on: February 13, 2016, 08:38:13 PM »

St. Jean "John" Eudes Pray for us......
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #74 on: February 13, 2016, 08:39:36 PM »

St. Giles Mary of St. Joseph
(1729-1812)
 
In the same year that a power-hungry Napoleon Bonaparte led his army into Russia, Giles Mary of St. Joseph ended a life of humble service to his Franciscan community and to the citizens of Naples.

Francesco was born in Taranto to very poor parents. His father’s death left the 18-year-old Francesco to care for the family. Having secured their future, he entered the Friars Minor at Galatone in 1754. For 53 years he served at St. Paschal’s Hospice in Naples in various roles, such as cook, porter or most often as official beggar for that community.

“Love God, love God” was his characteristic phrase as he gathered food for the friars and shared some of his bounty with the poor—all the while consoling the troubled and urging everyone to repent. The charity which he reflected on the streets of Naples was born in prayer and nurtured in the common life of the friars. The people whom Giles met on his begging rounds nicknamed him the “Consoler of Naples.” He was canonized in 1996.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
James - a humble servant
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« Reply #75 on: February 16, 2016, 11:17:48 AM »

St. Gilbert of Sempringham
(c. 1083-1189)
 
Gilbert was born in Sempringham, England, into a wealthy family, but he followed a path quite different from that expected of him as the son of a Norman knight. Sent to France for his higher education, he decided to pursue seminary studies.

He returned to England not yet ordained a priest, and inherited several estates from his father. But Gilbert avoided the easy life he could have led under the circumstances. Instead he lived a simple life at a parish, sharing as much as possible with the poor. Following his ordination to the priesthood he served as parish priest at Sempringham.

Among the congregation were seven young women who had expressed to him their desire to live in religious life. In response, Gilbert had a house built for them adjacent to the Church. There they lived an austere life, but one which attracted ever more numbers; eventually lay sisters and lay brothers were added to work the land. The religious order formed eventually became known as the Gilbertines, though Gilbert had hoped the Cistercians or some other existing order would take on the responsibility of establishing a rule of life for the new order. The Gilbertines, the only religious order of English origin founded during the Middle Ages, continued to thrive. But the order came to an end when King Henry VIII suppressed all Catholic monasteries.

Over the years a special custom grew up in the houses of the order called "the plate of the Lord Jesus." The best portions of the dinner were put on a special plate and shared with the poor, reflecting Gilbert's lifelong concern for less fortunate people.

Throughout his life Gilbert lived simply, consumed little food and spent a good portion of many nights in prayer. Despite the rigors of such a life he died at well over age 100.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
James - a humble servant
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« Reply #76 on: February 16, 2016, 11:21:22 AM »

Blessed Nicholas of Paglia
Friar & Priest

Blessed Nicholas was born at Giovinazzo,
near Bari, Italy, in 1197. While pursuing studies at
Bologna, he was drawn to the Order by a sermon of
Saint Dominic who personally gave him the habit
and made him one of his traveling companions. He
was well known for his preaching throughout the
Roman Province and compiled a concordance of
sacred scripture. He died at Perugia in 1256.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #77 on: February 17, 2016, 01:06:31 AM »

Quote
Throughout his life Gilbert lived simply, consumed little food and spent a good portion of many nights in prayer. Despite the rigors of such a life he died at well over age 100.

A good way to live life! And live life well! Cheesy

I am enjoying these readings! Thank you James!  Grin Grin Grin
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'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
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« Reply #78 on: February 17, 2016, 01:14:05 AM »

Your very welcome my friend !
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #79 on: February 17, 2016, 09:41:11 AM »

I have never heard of some of these saints before! 

What a great idea to share them with everyone!

Thank you!   Smiley
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