Saints' Discussion Forums
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 25, 2021, 10:55:32 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
* Home Help Calendar Mailbox Quotes Prayers Books Login Register
Saints' Discussion Forums  |  Forums  |  Saints' & Spiritual Life General Discussion  |  Topic: Solemnities, Feasts and Memorial days of the Saints 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 [7] 8 9 Print
Author Topic: Solemnities, Feasts and Memorial days of the Saints  (Read 49575 times)
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #96 on: March 29, 2016, 12:29:36 PM »

St. Ludovico of Casoria
(1814-1885)
 
  Born in Casoria (near Naples), Arcangelo Palmentieri was a cabinet-maker before entering the Friars Minor in 1832, taking the name Ludovico. After his ordination five years later, he taught chemistry, physics and mathematics to younger members of his province for several years.
  In 1847 he had a mystical experience which he later described as a cleansing. After that he dedicated his life to the poor and the infirm, establishing a dispensary for the poor, two schools for African children, an institute for the children of nobility, as well as an institution for orphans, the deaf and the speechless, and other institutes for the blind, elderly and for travelers. In addition to an infirmary for friars of his province, he began charitable institutes in Naples, Florence and Assisi. He once said, "Christ’s love has wounded my heart." This love prompted him to great acts of charity.
  To help continue these works of mercy, in 1859 he established the Gray Brothers, a religious community composed of men who formerly belonged to the Secular Franciscan Order. Three years later he founded the Gray Sisters of St. Elizabeth for the same purpose.
Toward the beginning of his final, nine-year illness, Ludovico wrote a spiritual testament which described faith as "light in the darkness, help in sickness, blessing in tribulations, paradise in the crucifixion and life amid death." The local work for his beatification began within five months of Ludovico’s death. He was beatified in 1993 and canonized in 2014.
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #97 on: April 05, 2016, 01:59:42 PM »

April 5 –

Saint Vincent Ferrer
Friar & Priest

Saint Vincent was born at Valencia, Spain, in
1350 and entered the Order at the age of 17. He
embraced a strict spiritual life and was later to write
of it in his treatise On the Spiritual Life. For a time he
assisted Peter de Luna, the cardinal legate, and John
I, king of Aragon, in reconciling both civil and
ecclesiastical disputes. All the while he preached,
first at Avignon, then in France and Italy. In 1399 he
gave himself totally to itinerant preaching. He was a
charismatic preacher who traveled throughout
Western Europe carrying out his preaching mission.
He died at Vannes, France, on April 5, 1419.
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
Shin
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18892



View Profile WWW
« Reply #98 on: April 05, 2016, 10:22:08 PM »

And from a biography:  Cheesy

Before even this saint of miracles was born. . .

One night while his father slept he dreamed that he entered the church of the Dominicans at Valencia, when one of that Order was preaching to the multitude from the pulpit, and that the preacher turning to him, addressed him in these words: "I felicitate you, William; in a few days you will have a son who will become a prodigy of learning and sanctity; he will be the object of your delight and the honour of your house; the world will resound with the fame of his wondrous deeds; he will fill heaven with joy and hell with terror; he will put on the habit that I wear, and will be received in the Church with universal joy, as one of its first Apostles."

God was pleased to work, while it was still in the maternal womb, by its mediation, a remarkable prodigy. His mother Constance went one day to visit a blind woman on whom she was wont to bestow a monthly alms, and having given it to her as usual she added, "My daughter, pray God that the child which I bear may arrive safe." The blind woman bent her head on the mother's bosom and said, "May God bestow that favour on you!" At the same instant her material blindness left her, and being suddenly illuminated in her soul with prophetic light, she exclaimed, "Madam, ti is an angel you have, and it is he who has cured me of my affliction."

The child, like another John the Baptist, applauded the words of the poor woman by leaping in the womb, and the mother herself gave testimony of it.

Such were the signs that preceded the birth of St. Vincent Ferrer.

The birth was an event for the whole city. The principle inhabitants made it a point of duty to accompany the new born to the  baptismal font. Besides a municipal deputation, three of the chief magistrates were present; and as they could not agree on the name that was to be given to this predestined child, the priest who administered the sacrament was divinely inspired to name him Vincent, a name that was in every was adapted to his future destiny. . .


'Try to convince yourself that there is no crime-laden sinner but would have served God better than you. . .  if he had received the same graces.'

St. Vincent Ferrer

'Do you desire to study to your advantage?  Let devotion accompany all your studies and study less to make yourself learned than to become a saint.'

St. Vincent Ferrer

'If you truly want to help the soul of your neighbor, you should approach God first with all your heart. Ask him simply to fill you with charity, the greatest of all virtues; with it you can accomplish what you desire.'

St. Vincent Ferrer

« Last Edit: April 05, 2016, 10:42:18 PM by Shin » Logged

'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #99 on: April 08, 2016, 02:00:55 PM »

St. Julie Billiart
(1751-1816)
 
Born in Cuvilly, France, into a family of well-to-do farmers, young Marie Rose Julie Billiart showed an early interest in religion and in helping the sick and poor. Though the first years of her life were relatively peaceful and uncomplicated, Julie had to take up manual work as a young teen when her family lost its money. However, she spent her spare time teaching catechism to young people and to the farm laborers.

A mysterious illness overtook her when she was about 30. Witnessing an attempt to wound or even kill her father, Julie was paralyzed and became a complete invalid. For the next two decades she continued to teach catechism lessons from her bed, offered spiritual advice and attracted visitors who had heard of her holiness.

When the French Revolution broke out in 1789, revolutionary forces became aware of her allegiance to fugitive priests. With the help of friends she was smuggled out of Cuvilly in a haycart; she spent several years hiding in Compiegne, being moved from house to house despite her growing physical pain. She even lost the power of speech for a time.

But this period also proved to be a fruitful spiritual time for Julie. It was at this time she had a vision in which she saw Calvary surrounded by women in religious habits and heard a voice saying, "Behold these spiritual daughters whom I give you in an Institute marked by the cross." As time passed and Julie continued her mobile life, she made the acquaintance of an aristocratic woman, Françoise Blin de Bourdon, who shared Julie's interest in teaching the faith. In 1803 the two women began the Institute of Notre Dame, which was dedicated to the education of the poor as well as young Christian girls and the training of catechists. The following year the first Sisters of Notre Dame made their vows. That was the same year that Julie recovered from the illness: She was able to walk for the first time in 22 years.

Though Julie had always been attentive to the special needs of the poor and that always remained her priority, she also became aware that other classes in society needed Christian instruction. From the founding of the Sisters of Notre Dame until her death, Julie was on the road, opening a variety of schools in France and Belgium that served the poor and the wealthy, vocational groups, teachers. Ultimately, Julie and Françoise moved the motherhouse to Namur, Belgium.

Julie died there in 1816. She was canonized in 1969.
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #100 on: April 08, 2016, 02:02:34 PM »

Thanks for adding the extra Info. on St Vincent Ferrer Brother !!! Smiley





littlepigeons
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #101 on: April 16, 2016, 12:16:45 PM »

St. Bernadette Soubirous
(1844-1879)

Bernadette Soubirous was born in 1844, the first child of an extremely poor miller in the town of Lourdes in southern France. The family was living in the basement of a dilapidated building when on February 11,1858, the Blessed Virgin Mary appeared to Bernadette in a cave above the banks of the Gave River near Lourdes. Bernadette, 14 years old, was known as a virtuous girl though a dull student who had not even made her first Holy Communion. In poor health, she had suffered from asthma from an early age.

There were 18 appearances in all, the final one occurring on the feast of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, July 16. Although Bernadette's initial reports provoked skepticism, her daily visions of "the Lady" brought great crowds of the curious. The Lady, Bernadette explained, had instructed her to have a chapel built on the spot of the visions. There the people were to come to wash in and drink of the water of the spring that had welled up from the very spot where Bernadette had been instructed to dig.

According to Bernadette, the Lady of her visions was a girl of 16 or 17 who wore a white robe with a blue sash. Yellow roses covered her feet, a large rosary was on her right arm. In the vision on March 25 she told Bernadette, "I am the Immaculate Conception." It was only when the words were explained to her that Bernadette came to realize who the Lady was.

Few visions have ever undergone the scrutiny that these appearances of the Immaculate Virgin were subject to. Lourdes became one of the most popular Marian shrines in the world, attracting millions of visitors. Miracles were reported at the shrine and in the waters of the spring. After thorough investigation Church authorities confirmed the authenticity of the apparitions in 1862.

During her life Bernadette suffered much. She was hounded by the public as well as by civic officials until at last she was protected in a convent of nuns. Five years later she petitioned to enter the Sisters of Notre Dame. After a period of illness she was able to make the journey from Lourdes and enter the novitiate. But within four months of her arrival she was given the last rites of the Church and allowed to profess her vows. She recovered enough to become infirmarian and then sacristan, but chronic health problems persisted. She died on April 16, 1879, at the age of 35.

She was canonized in 1933.
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
Shin
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18892



View Profile WWW
« Reply #102 on: April 16, 2016, 10:59:48 PM »

My mother has always loved the name -- St. Bernadette, pray for us!

'O Immaculate Mary! O glorious Saint Joseph! And you, Saint John, beloved disciple of the Divine Heart, teach me the great science of love! May it draw me powerfully! May I soar at last, may I take flight and hasten to lose myself, unite myself and disappear with you in the adorable heart of Jesus, and Jesus Crucified, the divine heart of Charity, purity, self-denial and perfect submission.'

St. Bernadette Soubirous

'Jesus does not want us to be attached to possessions, to human honors, to creatures. He asks humility. But His love and His generosity make this detachment less difficult and less cruel to our nature. Nothing else matters to me anymore, nothing has any value for me but Jesus, no place, no thing, no person, no idea, no feeling, no honor, no suffering, nothing that can turn me away from Jesus. For me, Jesus Himself is my honor, my delight, my heart, my spirit, He whom I love, what I love, my home Heaven here on earth. Jesus is my treasure and my love and Jesus crucified is my only happiness.'

St. Bernadette Soubirous

'For the greater glory of God, the important thing is not to do many things, but to do all things well.'

St. Bernadette Soubirous
Logged

'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #103 on: May 03, 2016, 02:55:18 PM »

Sts. Philip and James
 

James, Son of Alphaeus: We know nothing of this man except his name, and of course the fact that Jesus chose him to be one of the 12 pillars of the New Israel, his Church. He is not the James of Acts, son of Clopas, “brother” of Jesus and later bishop of Jerusalem and the traditional author of the Letter of James. James, son of Alphaeus, is also known as James the Lesser to avoid confusing him with James the son of Zebedee, also an apostle and known as James the Greater.

Philip: Philip came from the same town as Peter and Andrew, Bethsaida in Galilee. Jesus called him directly, whereupon he sought out Nathanael and told him of the “one about whom Moses wrote” (John 1:45).

Like the other apostles, Philip took a long time coming to realize who Jesus was. On one occasion, when Jesus saw the great multitude following him and wanted to give them food, he asked Philip where they should buy bread for the people to eat. St. John comments,
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #104 on: May 07, 2016, 12:49:24 PM »

St. Rose Venerini
(1656-1728)
 
Rose was born at Viterbo in Italy, the daughter of a doctor. Following the death of her fiancé she entered a convent, but soon returned home to care for her newly widowed mother. Meanwhile, Rose invited the women of the neighborhood to recite the rosary in her home, forming a sort of sodality with them.

As she looked to her future, Rose, under the spiritual guidance of a Jesuit priest, became convinced that she was called to become a teacher in the world rather than a contemplative nun in a convent. Clearly, she made the right choice: She was a born teacher, and the free school for girls she opened in 1685 was well received.

Soon the cardinal invited her to oversee the training of teachers and the administration of schools in his Diocese of Montefiascone. As Rose's reputation grew, she was called upon to organize schools in many parts of Italy, including Rome. Her disposition was right for the task as well, for Rose often met considerable opposition but was never deterred.

She died in Rome in 1728, where a number of miracles were attributed to her. She was beatified in 1952 and canonized in 2006. The sodality, or group of women she had invited to prayer, was ultimately given the rank of a religious congregation. Today, the so-called Venerini Sisters can be found in the United States and elsewhere, working among Italian immigrants.

Comment:
Whatever state of life God calls us to, we bring with us an assortment of experiences, interests and gifts—however small they seem to us. Rose’s life stands as a reminder that all we are is meant to be put to service wherever we find ourselves.

AND

Blessed Albert of Bergamo
Lay Dominican & Husband

Blessed Albert was born in Valle d’Ogna near Bergamo in 1214. As a married man he was known for his generosity to the poor, a virtue for which his wife reproached him. Upon the death of his wife, being childless, he left his father’s farm and went to Cremona where he lived in poverty. His poverty was a witness to a group of heretics there who boasted of their own poverty. Attracted by the life of Saint Dominic he joined the Brothers of Penance, which later became the Order of Penance of St. Dominic, and lived at the Dominican priory. He died on May 7, 1279.
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
Shin
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18892



View Profile WWW
« Reply #105 on: June 01, 2016, 08:52:17 AM »

St. Justin, Martyr

ST. JUSTIN was born at Neapolis, now Naplosa, the ancient Sichem, and formerly the capital of the province of Samaria. Vespasian, having endowed its inhabitants with the privileges belonging to Roman citizens, gave it the name of Flavia. His son Titus sent thither a colony of Greeks, among whom were the father and grandfather of our saint. His father, a heathen, 1 brought him up in the errors and superstitions of paganism, but at the same time did not neglect to cultivate his mind by several branches of human literature. St. Justin accordingly informs us, that he spent his youth in reading the poets, orators, and historians. Having gone through the usual course of these studies, he gave himself up to that of philosophy in quest of truth, an ardent love of which was his predominant passion. He addressed himself first to a master who was a Stoic; and after having staid some time with him, seeing he could learn nothing of him concerning God, he left him, and went to a Peripatetic, a very subtle man in his own conceit; but Justin, being desired the second day after admission, to fix his master’s salary, that he might know what he was to be allowed for his pains in teaching him, he left him also, concluding that he was no philosopher. He then tried a Pythagorean, who had a great reputation, and who boasted much of his wisdom; but he required of his scholar, as a necessary preliminary to his admission, that he should have learned music, astronomy, and geometry. Justin could not bear such delays in the search of God, and preferred the school of an Academic, under whom he made great progress in the Platonic philosophy, and vainly flattered himself with the hope of arriving in a short time at the sight of God, which the Platonic philosophy seemed to have had chiefly in view.

Walking one day by the sea-side, for the advantage of a greater freedom from noise and tumult, he saw, as he turned about, an old man who followed him pretty close. His appearance was majestic, and had a great mixture in it of mildness and gravity. Justin looking on him very attentively, the man asked him if he knew him. Justin answered in the negative. “Why then,” said he, “do you look so steadfastly upon me?” Justin replied: “It is the effect of my surprise to meet any human creature in this remote and solitary place.” “What brought me hither,” said that old man, “was my concern for some of my friends. They are gone a journey, and I am come hither to look out for them.” They then fell into a long discourse concerning the excellency of philosophy in general, and of the Platonic in particular, which Justin asserted to be the only true way to happiness, and of knowing and seeing God. This the grave person refuted at large, and at length by the force of his arguments convinced him that those philosophers, whom he had the greatest esteem for, Plato and Pythagoras, had been mistaken in their principles, and had not a thorough knowledge of God and of the soul of man, nor could they in consequence communicate it to others. This drew from him the important query, Who were the likeliest persons to set him in the right way? The stranger answered, that long before the existence of these reputed philosophers, there were certain blessed men, lovers of God, and divinely inspired, called prophets, on account of their foretelling things which have since come to pass; whose books, yet extant, contain many solid instructions about the first cause and end of all things, and many other particulars becoming a philosopher to know. That their miracles and their predictions had procured them such credit, that they established truth by authority, and not by disputes and elaborate demonstrations of human reason, of which few men are capable. That they inculcated the belief of one only God, the Father and author of all things, and of his Son Jesus Christ, whom he had sent into the world. He concluded his discourse with this advice: “As for thyself, above all things, pray that the gates of life may be opened unto thee; for these are not things to be discerned, unless God and Christ grant to a man the knowledge of them.”

After these words he departed, and Justin saw him no more; but his conversation left a deep impression on the young philosopher’s soul, and kindled there an ardent affection for these true philosophers, the prophets. And upon a further inquiry into the credibility of the Christian religion, he embraced it soon after. What had also no small weight in persuading him of the truth of the Christian faith, was the innocence and true virtue of its professors; seeing with what courage and constancy, rather than to betray their religion, or commit the least sin, they suffered the sharpest tortures, and encountered, nay even courted death itself, in its most horrible shapes. “When I heard the Christians traduced and reproached,” says he, “yet saw them fearless and rushing on death and all things that are accounted most dreadful to human nature, I concluded with myself that it was impossible those men should wallow in vice, and be carried away with the love of lust and pleasure.”

. . .

St. Justin made a long stay in Rome, dwelling near the Timothin baths, on the Viminal hill. The Christians met in his house to perform their devotions, and he applied himself with great zeal to the instruction of all those who resorted to him. Evelpistus, who suffered with him, owned at his examination that he had heard with pleasure Justin’s discourses. The judge was acquainted with his zeal, when he asked him, in what place he assembled his disciples? Not content with labouring in the conversion of Jews and Gentiles, he exerted his endeavours in defending the Catholic faith against all the heresies of that age. His excellent volumes against Marcion, as they are styled by St. Jerom, are now lost, with several other works commended by the ancients. The martyr, after his first apology, left Rome, and probably performed the functions of an evangelist in many countries for several years. In the reign of Antoninus Pius, being at Ephesus, and casually meeting in the walks of Xistus Tryphon, whom Eusebius calls the most celebrated Jew of that age, and who was a famous philosopher, he fell into discourse with him, which brought on a disputation, which was held in the presence of several witnesses during two entire days. St. Justin afterwards committed to writing this dialogue with Tryphon, which work is a simple narrative of a familiar unstudied conversation. Tryphon seeing Justin in the philosopher’s cloak, addressed him on the excellency of philosophy. The saint answered, that he admired he should not rather study Moses and the prophets, in comparison of whom all the writings of the philosophers are empty jargon and foolish dreams. Then, in the first part of his dialogue, he showed that, according to the prophets, the old law was temporary, and to be abolished by the new: and in the second, that Christ was God before all ages, distinct from the Father—the same that appeared to Abraham, Moses, &c. the same that created man, and was himself made man, and crucified.

. . .

Justin and others that were with him were apprehended, and brought before Rusticus, prefect of Rome. . . [and after being interrogated and urged to deny the faith] . . .

. . .

The martyrs were forthwith led to the place where criminals were executed, and there, amidst the praises and thanksgivings which they did not cease to pour forth to God, were first scourged, and afterwards beheaded. After their martyrdom, certain Christians carried off their bodies privately, and gave them an honourable burial. St. Justin is one of the most ancient fathers of the church who has left us works of any considerable note. Tatian, his disciple, writes, that, of all men, he was the most worthy of admiration.  Eusebius, St. Jerom, St. Epiphanius, Theodoret, &c. bestow on him the highest praises.

[He suffered about the year of Our Lord 167, in the reign of Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus.]

- from the Lives of the Saints
Logged

'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
Shin
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18892



View Profile WWW
« Reply #106 on: June 02, 2016, 08:29:10 AM »

SS. Marcellinus and Peter, Martyrs

MARCELLINUS was a priest, and Peter an exorcist, both of the clergy of Rome, and eminent for their zeal and piety. In the persecution of Dioclesian, about the year of Our Lord 304, they were condemned to die for their faith: and by a secret order of the judge, the executioner led them into a forest, that the holy men being executed privately, no Christians might be acquainted with the place of their sepulchre.

When he had brought them into a thicket overgrown with thorns and briers, three miles from Rome, he declared to them his sanguinary commission. The saints cheerfully fell to work themselves, grubbed up the brambles, and cleared a spot fit for their sepulchre.

After they were beheaded, their bodies were buried in the same place. Some time after, Lucilla, a pious lady, being informed by revelation, and assisted by another devout lady named Firmina, took up their bodies, and honourably interred them near that of St. Tiburtius on the Lavican road in the Catacombs.

Pope Damasus assures us, that, when a child, he learned all these particulars from the mouth of the executioner himself, and he has inserted them in a Latin epitaph with which he adorned their tomb.

- From the Lives of the Saints
Logged

'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #107 on: June 02, 2016, 01:38:04 PM »

Blessed Sadoc
Friar & Priest, & Companions, Martyrs

According to tradition Bl. Sadoc received the
habit from St. Dominic himself at the General
Chapter of Bologna in 1221 was chosen to
accompany Master Paul of Hungary, who had
been commissioned to establish a province in
Hungary. Later Bl. Sadoc moved on to Poland
where he preached the gospel for nearly forty
years. In 1260 he and 48 members of the
Dominican community at Sandomierz were
martyred by the Tartars as they were singing the

Salve Regina at Compline. The custom of singing
the Salve Regina at the deathbed of Dominicans
stems from this incident.
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
Shin
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18892



View Profile WWW
« Reply #108 on: June 02, 2016, 03:15:55 PM »

How good to see you my friend! I pray your health is good!! Cheesy

Blessed Sadoc pray for us!

All ye holy martyrs pray for us!


Logged

'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #109 on: June 02, 2016, 03:41:06 PM »

Health is good amen !!!

All the holy souls pray for us !!!!
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
James - a humble servant
A son of St. Dominic
Established
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1911


~ Matthew 20: 28 ~


View Profile
« Reply #110 on: June 08, 2016, 02:55:50 AM »

June 8 -


Blessed Diana, Cecilia and Amata
Nuns & Virgins

Bl. Diana, a member of the powerful d'Andalo family, was born at Bologna at the beginning of the 13th century. Attracted to the Order by the preaching of Bl. Reginald, Diana overcame the strong objections of her family and in 1222 with the help of Bl. Jordan of Saxony founded the Monastery of Saint Agnes where she lived until her death in 1236. There, letters which Bl. Jordan wrote to her are a splendid testament to the spirituality of the Dominican family and to the association of brothers and sisters within the Dominican family.
&
Bl. Cecilia was born at Rome around 1200 of the noble Caesarini family. In 1220 Pope Honorius III asked St. Dominic to reform several Roman monasteries, among them Santa Maria in Tempulo of which Bl. Cecilia was a member. According to tradition she was the first to express enthusiasm for the project and the first to receive the habit from the hands of Saint Dominic at the new Monastery of Saint Sixtus. In late 1223 or early 1224 she and three other nuns were sent to the Monastery of St. Agnes in Bologna to help with the new foundation. To her we are indebted for our only physical descripttion of the appearance of St. Dominic. She died around 1290.
&
Not to be forgotten is Blessed Amata (beloved). Legend has it that St. Dominic named her himself. She was a nun at St. Sixtus with Bl. Cecilia also receiving the habit from St. Dominic. She was beatified in 1891 with Diana and Cecilia but was not included on the calendar because so little is known of her.
Logged

"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
Shin
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18892



View Profile WWW
« Reply #111 on: June 08, 2016, 09:47:34 PM »

Pray for us O holy virgins of Christ!
Logged

'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus. (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 [7] 8 9 Print 
Saints' Discussion Forums  |  Forums  |  Saints' & Spiritual Life General Discussion  |  Topic: Solemnities, Feasts and Memorial days of the Saints « previous next »
Jump to:  



Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines