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Saints' Discussion Forums  |  Forums  |  Saints' & Spiritual Life General Discussion  |  Topic: Solemnities, Feasts and Memorial days of the Saints 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Solemnities, Feasts and Memorial days of the Saints  (Read 50673 times)
CyrilSebastian
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« Reply #48 on: December 08, 2015, 04:13:39 PM »

                  The Feast of the Immaculate Conception is December 8th.       
                  Part of the First Verse of Sing We of the Blessed Mother:     
                         
                                   Sing we of the blessed Mother     
                                   Who received the angel's word,     
                                   And obedient to his summons     
                                   Bore in love the infant Lord
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« Reply #49 on: January 08, 2016, 02:55:17 AM »

Jan. 7


St. Raymond of Peñafort
(1175-1275) [M]
Spanish, priest, canonist, diplomat, Third Master
of the Order
, Church appointed patron of canonists,
canonized in 1601.

St. Raymond of Pennafort, Patron Saint of Canonists. Born in Spain, St. Raymond was a relative of the King of Aragon. From childhood he had a tender love and devotion to the Blessed Mother. He finished his studies at an early age, and became a famous teacher. He then gave up all his honors and entered the Order of the Dominicans. St. Raymond was very humble and very close to God. He did much penance and was so good and kind that he won many sinners to God. With King James of Aragon and St. Peter Nolasco he founded the Order of Our Lady of Ransom. The brave religious of this Order devoted themselves to saving poor Christians captured by the Moors.

Once he went with King James to the Island of Majorca to preach about Jesus. King James was a man of great qualities, but he let himself be ruled by passions. There on the Island, too, he was giving bad example. The Saint commanded him to send the woman away. The King said he would, but he did not keep his promise. So St. Raymond decided to leave the Island. The King declared he would punish any ship captain who brought the Saint back to Barcelona. Putting all his trust in God, Saint Raymond spread his cloak upon the water, tied up one corner of it to a stick for a sail, made the Sign of the Cross, stepped onto the cloak, and sailed along for six hours until he reached Barcelona. This miracle moved the King. He was sorry for what he had done, and he became a true follower of St. Raymond. St. Raymond was one hundred years old at the time of his death.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #50 on: January 11, 2016, 02:48:14 AM »

St. Raymond Penafort, pray for us!  crucifix
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« Reply #51 on: January 11, 2016, 11:27:26 PM »

January 11


Bl. Bernard Scammacca
(1430-1487) [M]
Sicilian, priest, penitent, mystic.

  Bernard Scammacca was born in Sicily, at the beginning of the 15th century. His parents were wealthy and pious, and Bernard was given a good education. In spite of this good training, he spent a careless youth. Only after he was badly injured in a quarrel was he brought back to his senses. His long convalescence gave him plenty of time to think, and once he was able to go out of the house, he went to the Dominican convent of Catania and begged to be admitted to the order.

  Bernard, as a religious, was the exact opposite of what he had been as a young man. Now he made no effort to obtain the things he had valued all his life, but spent his time in prayer and solitude. There is little recorded of his life, except that he kept the rule meticulously, and that he was particularly kind to sinners in the confessional. Apparently, he did not attain fame as a preacher, but was content to spend his time in the work of the confessional and the private direction of souls.

  One legend pictures Bernard as having great power over birds and animals. When he walked outside in the garden, praying, the birds would flutter down around him, singing; but as soon as he went into ecstasy, they kept still, for fear they would disturb him. Once, the porter was sent to Bernard's room to call him, and saw a bright light shinning under the door. Peeking through the keyhole, he saw a beautiful child shinning with light and holding a book, from which Bernard was reading. He hurried to get the prior to see the marvel.

  Bernard had the gift of prophecy, which he used on several occasions to try warning people to amend their lives. He prophesied his own death, which occurred in 1486. Fifteen years after his death, he appeared to the prior, telling him to transfer his remains to the Rosary chapel. During this translation, a man was cured of paralysis by touching the relics.


 
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
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« Reply #52 on: January 12, 2016, 02:53:54 PM »

January 12



St. Marguerite Bourgeoys
(1620-1700)


“God closes a door and then opens a window,” people sometimes say when dealing with their own disappointment or someone else’s. That was certainly true in Marguerite’s case. Children from European as well as Native American backgrounds in seventeenth-century Canada benefited from her great zeal and unshakable trust in God’s providence.
Born the sixth of 12 children in Troyes, France, Marguerite at the age of 20 believed that she was called to religious life. Her applications to the Carmelites and Poor Clares were unsuccessful. A priest friend suggested that perhaps God had other plans for her.

In 1654, the governor of the French settlement in Canada visited his sister, an Augustinian canoness in Troyes. Marguerite belonged to a sodality connected to that convent. The governor invited her to come to Canada and start a school in Ville-Marie (eventually the city of Montreal). When she arrived, the colony numbered 200 people with a hospital and a Jesuit mission chapel.

Soon after starting a school, she realized her need for coworkers. Returning to Troyes, she recruited a friend, Catherine Crolo, and two other young women. In 1667 they added classes at their school for Indian children. A second trip to France three years later resulted in six more young women and a letter from King Louis XIV, authorizing the school. The Congregation of Notre Dame was established in 1676 but its members did not make formal religious profession until 1698 when their Rule and constitutions were approved.

Marguerite established a school for Indian girls in Montreal. At the age of 69, she walked from Montreal to Quebec in response to the bishop’s request to establish a community of her sisters in that city. By the time she died, she was referred to as the “Mother of the Colony.” Marguerite was canonized in 1982.

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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
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« Reply #53 on: January 13, 2016, 01:07:49 PM »

January 13



St. Hilary
(315? - 368) [M]

This staunch defender of the divinity of Christ was a gentle and courteous man, devoted to writing some of the greatest theology on the Trinity, and was like his Master in being labeled a “disturber of the peace.” In a very troubled period in the Church, his holiness was lived out in both scholarship and controversy. He was bishop of Poitiers in France.
Raised a pagan, he was converted to Christianity when he met his God of nature in the Scriptures. His wife was still living when he was chosen, against his will, to be the bishop of Poitiers in France. He was soon taken up with battling what became the scourge of the fourth century, Arianism, which denied the divinity of Christ.
The heresy spread rapidly. St. Jerome said “The world groaned and marveled to find that it was Arian.” When Emperor Constantius ordered all the bishops of the West to sign a condemnation of Athanasius, the great defender of the faith in the East, Hilary refused and was banished from France to far off Phrygia (in modern-day Turkey). Eventually he was called the “Athanasius of the West.” While writing in exile, he was invited by some semi-Arians (hoping for reconciliation) to a council the emperor called to counteract the Council of Nicea. But Hilary predictably defended the Church, and when he sought public debate with the heretical bishop who had exiled him, the Arians, dreading the meeting and its outcome, pleaded with the emperor to send this troublemaker back home. Hilary was welcomed by his people.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #54 on: January 13, 2016, 11:36:42 PM »

St. Hilary, Bishop of Poiters also known as:

Athanasius of the West
Doctor of the Divinity of Christ
Hammer against Arianism

Traditionally his feast is today.


'To those who wish to stand in God’s grace, neither the guardianship of saints nor the defenses of angels are wanting.'

St. Hilary
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« Reply #55 on: January 14, 2016, 12:59:45 PM »

St. Felix of Nola
(d. ?)
Born at Nola, near Naples, and lived in the third century. After his father's death he distributed almost all his goods amongst the poor, and was ordained priest by Maximum Bishop of Nola. In the year 250, when the Decian persecution broke out, Maximus was forced to flee. The persecutors seized on Felix and he was cruelly scourged, loaded with chains, and cast into prison. One night an angel appeared to him and bade him go to help Maximus. His chains fell off, the doors opened, and the saint was enabled to bring relief to the bishop, who was then speechless from cold and hunger. On the persecutors making a second attempt to secure Felix, his escape was miraculously effected by a spider weaving her web over the opening of a hole into which he had just crept. Thus deceived, they sought their prey elsewhere. The persecution ceased the following year, and Felix, who had lain hidden in a dry well for six months, returned to his duties. On the death of Maximus he was earnestly desired as bishop, but he persuaded the people to choose another, his senior in the priesthood. The remnant of his estate having been confiscated in the persecution, he refused to take it back, and for his subsistence rented three acres of land, which he tilled with his own hands. Whatever remained over he gave to the poor, and if he had two coats at any time he invariably gave them the better. He lived to a ripe old age and died 14 January (on which day he is commemorated), but the year of his death is uncertain. Five churches were built in his honour, outside Nola, where his remains are kept, but some relics are also at Rome and Benevento. St. Paulinus, who acted as porter to one of these churches, testifies to numerous pilgrimages made in honour of Felix. The poems and letters of Paulinus on Felix are the source from which St. Gregory of Tours, Venerable Bede, and the priest Marcellus have drawn their biographies (see PAULINUS OF NOLA). There is another Felix of Nola, bishop and martyr under a Prefect Martianus. He is considered by some to be the same as the above.

Also

St. Dacius
(d. 552)

Bishop of Milan, Italy, probably from 530, exiled by the Arian Ostrogoths. When Milan was attacked by the Goths, General Belisarius of Constantinople, failed to aid the city. It is believed that Datius was taken prisoner for a time but was freed by his friend Cassiodorus. He went to Constantinople to support Pope Vigilius against Emperor Justinian in the Three Chapter Controversy of 545 . He probably died there.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #56 on: January 18, 2016, 12:24:05 PM »

Jan-18



St. Margaret of Hungary
(1242-1270) [M] [F for the nuns]
Hungarian, virgin, royal princess, nun, mystic, daughter of
King Bela IV, she became a Dominican novice at twelve in
a royal convent built on an island in the Danube. Although
she was a princess among nuns who were of noble descent,
she objected to any special treatment and went out of her
way to perform the most menial tasks and the most exacting
labors on behalf of the squalid poor and most advanced
hospital cases. The extent of her labors, fasting and hours
of prayer brought on the fatigue of which she died on
January 18, her feast day.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #57 on: January 18, 2016, 02:15:03 PM »

One reads that. . .

Her entire life was an unbroken chain of devotional exercises and penances. From early childhood she chastised herself unceasingly, wore hair garments, and an iron girdle around her waist, as well as shoes spiked with nails. She was frequently scourged and did the most menial work of the convent.

When St. Margaret was only 10 years old two Dominican friars came to visit. She wished them to stay longer but they refused and would leave at once, so she said, "I shall ask God that it may rain so hard that you cannot get away". And although they said no rain would stop them, it rained so hard it was impossible for them to depart. It is as if she were a young St. Scholastica, and you can see she was already being prepared by Providence with love to live under the care of St. Dominic's descendants.

S. Margaret of Hungary, ora pro nobis.
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« Reply #58 on: January 21, 2016, 02:56:09 PM »

St. Agnes
(d. 258?)

Almost nothing is known of this saint except that she was very young, 12 or 13 when she was martyred in the last half of the third century. Various modes of death have been suggested: beheading, burning, strangling.

Legend has it that Agnes was a beautiful girl whom many young men wanted to marry. Among those she refused, one reported her to the authorities for being a Christian. She was arrested and confined to a house of prostitution. The legend continues that a man who looked upon her lustfully lost his sight and had it restored by her prayer. Agnes was condemned, executed and buried near Rome in a catacomb that eventually was named after her. The daughter of Constantine built a basilica in her honor.

Quote:
"This is a virgin's birthday; let us follow the example of her chastity. It is a martyr's birthday; let us offer sacrifices; it is the birthday of holy Agnes: let men be filled with wonder, little ones with hope, married women with awe, and the unmarried with emulation. It seems to me that this child, holy beyond her years and courageous beyond human nature, receives the name of Agnes [Greek: pure] not as an earthly designation but as a revelation from God of what she was to be" (from Saint Ambrose's discourse on virginity).
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~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #59 on: January 23, 2016, 08:45:52 AM »

'What threats the executioner used to make her fear him, what allurements to persuade her, how many desired that she would come to them in marriage! But she answered: “It would be an injury to my spouse to look on any one as likely to please me. He who chose me first for Himself shall receive me. Why are you delaying, executioner? Let this body perish which can be loved by eyes which I would not.” She stood, she prayed, she bent down her neck. You could see the executioner tremble, as though he himself had been condemned, and his right hand shake, his face grow pale, as he feared the peril of another, while the maiden feared not for her own. You have then in one victim a twofold martyrdom, of modesty and of religion. She both remained a virgin and she obtained martyrdom.'

St. Ambrose of Milan
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« Reply #60 on: January 23, 2016, 12:02:51 PM »

Thanks Shin. May we all have that kind of devotion............
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« Reply #61 on: January 23, 2016, 12:54:13 PM »

January 23rd


St. Marianne Cope
(1838-1918)

Though leprosy scared off most people in 19th-century Hawaii, that disease sparked great generosity in the woman who came to be known as Mother Marianne of Molokai. Her courage helped tremendously to improve the lives of its victims in Hawaii, a territory annexed to the United States during her lifetime (1898).

Mother Marianne’s generosity and courage were celebrated at her May 14, 2005, beatification in Rome. She was a woman who spoke “the language of truth and love” to the world, said Cardinal José Saraiva Martins, prefect of the Congregation for Saints’ Causes. Cardinal Martins, who presided at the beatification Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica, called her life “a wonderful work of divine grace.” Speaking of her special love for persons suffering from leprosy, he said, “She saw in them the suffering face of Jesus. Like the Good Samaritan, she became their mother.”

On January 23, 1838, a daughter was born to Peter and Barbara Cope of Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany. The girl was named after her mother. Two years later the Cope family emigrated to the United States and settled in Utica, New York. Young Barbara worked in a factory until August 1862, when she went to the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Syracuse, New York. After profession in November of the next year, she began teaching at Assumption parish school.

Marianne held the post of superior in several places and was twice the novice mistress of her congregation. A natural leader, three different times she was superior of St. Joseph’s Hospital in Syracuse, where she learned much that would be useful during her years in Hawaii.

Elected provincial in 1877, Mother Marianne was unanimously re-elected in 1881. Two years later the Hawaiian government was searching for someone to run the Kakaako Receiving Station for people suspected of having leprosy. More than 50 religious communities in the United States and Canada were asked. When the request was put to the Syracuse sisters, 35 of them volunteered immediately. On October 22, 1883, Mother Marianne and six other sisters left for Hawaii where they took charge of the Kakaako Receiving Station outside Honolulu; on the island of Maui they also opened a hospital and a school for girls.

In 1888, Mother Marianne and two sisters went to Molokai to open a home for “unprotected women and girls” there. The Hawaiian government was quite hesitant to send women for this difficult assignment; they need not have worried about Mother Marianne! On Molokai she took charge of the home that St. Damien de Veuster [May 10, d. 1889] had established for men and boys. Mother Marianne changed life on Molokai by introducing cleanliness, pride and fun to the colony. Bright scarves and pretty dresses for the women were part of her approach.

Awarded the Royal Order of Kapiolani by the Hawaiian government and celebrated in a poem by Robert Louis Stevenson, Mother Marianne continued her work faithfully. Her sisters have attracted vocations among the Hawaiian people and still work on Molokai.

Mother Marianne died on August 9, 1918 and was beatified in 2005 and canonized seven years later.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #62 on: January 23, 2016, 01:10:16 PM »

Also on Jan. 23rd -


Bl. HENRY SUSO, OP

(1295-1366)
PRIEST, MYSTIC, POET, “SERVANT OF THE ETERNAL WISDOM”

Famed German Dominican mystic whose work, The Book of Eternal Wisdom, is considered a classic. Born Heinrich von Berg in Constance, Swabia, he entered the Order of Preachers, the Dominicans, at an early age.
Undergoing a conversion, he developed an abiding spiritual life and studied under Meister Eckhart in Cologne from 1322-1325. He then returned to Constance to teach, subsequently authoring numerous books on spirituality: Das Buchlein der Wahrheit (The Little Book of Truth, 1327) and Das Buchlein der Ewigen Weisheit (The Little Book of Eternal Wisdom, 1328), a book of practical meditations that became the most popular work on mysticism until the Imitation of Christ by Thomas à Kempis; Horologium Sapientiae (Clock of Wisdom); sermons; and a life of the Dominican nun Elsbeth Stägel (d. 1360).
As he supported Meister Eckhart — who was then the source of some controversy and had been condemned by Pope John XXII (r. 1316-1334) in 1329 — Henry was censured by his superiors and stripped of his teaching position. He subsequently became a preacher in Switzerland and the Upper Rhine and was a brilliant spiritual adviser among the Dominicans and the spiritual community of the Gottesfreunde. He endured persecution right up until his death at Ulm. Pope Gregory XVI (r. 1831-1846) beatified him in 1831.
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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« Reply #63 on: January 28, 2016, 10:23:05 AM »

Happy Feast Day Everyone !


St. Thomas Aquinas
(1225-1274)

By universal consent, Thomas Aquinas is the preeminent spokesman of the Catholic tradition of reason and of divine revelation. He is one of the great teachers of the medieval Catholic Church, honored with the titles Doctor of the Church and Angelic Doctor.
At five he was given to the Benedictine monastery at Monte Cassino in his parents’ hopes that he would choose that way of life and eventually became abbot. In 1239 he was sent to Naples to complete his studies. It was here that he was first attracted to Aristotle’s philosophy.
By 1243, Thomas abandoned his family’s plans for him and joined the Dominicans, much to his mother’s dismay. On her order, Thomas was captured by his brother and kept at home for over a year.
Once free, he went to Paris and then to Cologne, where he finished his studies with Albert the Great. He held two professorships at Paris, lived at the court of Pope Urban IV, directed the Dominican schools at Rome and Viterbo, combated adversaries of the mendicants, as well as the Averroists, and argued with some Franciscans about Aristotelianism.
His greatest contribution to the Catholic Church is his writings. The unity, harmony and continuity of faith and reason, of revealed and natural human knowledge, pervades his writings. One might expect Thomas, as a man of the gospel, to be an ardent defender of revealed truth. But he was broad enough, deep enough, to see the whole natural order as coming from God the Creator, and to see reason as a divine gift to be highly cherished.
The Summa Theologiae, his last and, unfortunately, uncompleted work, deals with the whole of Catholic theology. He stopped work on it after celebrating Mass on December 6, 1273. When asked why he stopped writing, he replied, “I cannot go on.... All that I have written seems to me like so much straw compared to what I have seen and what has been revealed to me.” He died March 7, 1274.

Quote:
“Hence we must say that for the knowledge of any truth whatsoever man needs divine help, that the intellect may be moved by God to its act. But he does not need a new light added to his natural light, in order to know the truth in all things, but only in some that surpasses his natural knowledge” (Summa Theologiae, I-II, 109, 1).
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"O Holy Lord grant me the graces and helps I need to be faithful to all of the responsibilities and duties of my vocation and my state in life and in the faithful living of the true Spiritual Life. Amen."
~ St. Thomas Aquinas
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