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Saints' Discussion Forums  |  Forums  |  Catholic General Discussion  |  Topic: How to pick the best Chaplets...not enough time to say them all 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: How to pick the best Chaplets...not enough time to say them all  (Read 112 times)
Uriel
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« on: May 14, 2021, 06:55:19 PM »

Hello

At present, I find myself saying the Angel Crown chaplet, Uriel chaplet, Seven Dolors of Mary chaplet and the Rosery. I also ordered a Sacred Heart chaplet and will add that also to my other ones and other daily prayers.

At times I feel that I am overdoing it or overwhelmed with having to say all them in the course of one day.

I also have a full time job and family.

Why are there so many Chaplets, that are divinely inspired, when it is impossible to say them all?

Are there certain chaplets that are more important than others?

What are your thoughts and what chaplets do you reciet?
« Last Edit: May 14, 2021, 07:43:22 PM by Uriel » Logged
Benedict
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2021, 09:42:43 PM »

Technically, the devotion to the Holy Trinity is most important, followed in importance by the devotion to the Holy Eucharist, followed in importance by the devotion to Mary and then the devotion to the Angel's would be below Mary.
The devotion to the Sacred Heart is a universal devotion embraced by the entire Church and promoted by the Magisterium, the entire world has been consecrated to the Sacred Heart and the Sacred Heart devotion is Eucharistic in nature. The devotion to the Sacred Heart also promises salvation so it has the greatest promises of the ones listed. The Rosary is the greatest Marian devotion, greater than the 7 sorrows of Mary. The Rosary also promises salvation to those who say it, and that it is more blessed and indulgenced than all other devotions. A well prayed single Rosary has more merit than all other devotions combined. I personally recommend focusing on the Sacred Heart and the Rosary. The Sacred Heart Litany is also a great replacement for a Sacred Heart chaplet and the Litany of Loretto is encouraged to be said after the Rosary.
 These two devotions are enough to make you a Saint if practiced devoutly. Devotion to the angels is entirely optional and Uriel is not among the dogmatically named arch angels and has no feast day. It would be better to say a Saint Michael chaplet or Litany on occasion than a Uriel chaplet.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2021, 10:09:03 PM by Benedict » Logged

PAX
CRUX SANCTI PATRIS BENEDICTI
CRUX SACRA SIT MIHI LUX!
NON DRACO SIT MIHI DUX!
VADE RETRO SATANA!
NUMQUAM SUADE MIHI VANA!
SUNT MALA QUAE LIBAS
IPSE VENENA BIBAS!
All Glory Be To God!
All Praise Be To God!
For God Is Greater Than All Things!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!
Uriel
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2021, 09:36:22 AM »

Thanks for the reply. I will concentrate on the Rosary, Sacred Heart chaplet, Angelic Crown chaplet.

Uriel is still seen as an archangel via the Church? I know that the Pope, forgot name, limited the archangels to the big three in the medieval ages but that does not mean Uriel does not exist.

Please, help clarify.
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Benedict
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2021, 02:49:06 PM »

Thanks for the reply. I will concentrate on the Rosary, Sacred Heart chaplet, Angelic Crown chaplet.

Uriel is still seen as an archangel via the Church? I know that the Pope, forgot name, limited the archangels to the big three in the medieval ages but that does not mean Uriel does not exist.

Please, help clarify.
Uriel is simply a Hebrew name mentioned in the pseudonymous work of Enoch which has never reached inspired status among the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church.
Uriel means "Flame of God"
The cult of Uriel was suppressed in 745AD at the Council of Rome by Pope Saint Zachary. The name Uriel is not mentioned among the Canonical Inspired Books.
The Church does not confess to know the names of the 7 Archangels other than the three given in Scripture, Michael, Gabriel and Raphael.
Thus the name does not necessarily belong to any angel but perhaps a person.
The name is found in 2 Chronicles 13
1 Anno octavodecimo regis Jeroboam, regnavit Abia super Judam.
2 Tribus annis regnavit in Jerusalem, nomenque matris ejus Michaia filia Uriel de Gabaa: et erat bellum inter Abiam et Jeroboam.
1 Abia, coming to the throne of Juda in the eighteenth year of Jeroboam,
2 reigned three years at Jerusalem; his mother was called Michaia, daughter of Uriel from Gabaa. Between Jeroboam and Abia, a state of war continued.

Furthermore
The Holy See’s 2001 Directory on Popular Piety and the Liturgy, writes of the Holy Angels
Quote
Holy Angels

213. With the clear and sober language of catechesis, the Church teaches that "the existence of the spiritual, non-corporeal beings that Sacred Scripture usually calls 'angels' is a truth of faith. The witness of Scripture is as clear as the unanimity of Tradition"(280).

Tradition regards the angels as messengers of God, "potent executives of his commands, and ready at the sound of his words" (Ps 103, 20. They serve his salvific plan, and are "sent to serve those who will inherit salvation" (Hb 1, 14).

214. The faithful are well aware of the numerous interventions of angels in the New and Old Covenants. They closed the gates of the earthly paradise (cf. Gen 3,24), they saved Hagar and her child Ishmael (cf. Gen 21, 17), they stayed the hand of Abraham as he was about to sacrifice Isaac (cf. gen 22, 7), they announce prodigious births (cf. Jud 13, 3-7), they protect the footsteps of the just (cf. Ps 91, 11), they praise God unceasingly (cf. Is 6, 1-4), and they present the prayer of the Saints to God (cf. Ap 8, 34). The faithful are also aware of the angel's coming to help Elijah, an exhausted fugitive (cf. 1 Kings 19, 4-8), of Azariah and his companions in the fiery furnace (cf. Dan 3, 49-50), and are familiar with the story of Tobias in which Raphael, "one of the seven Angels who stand ever ready to enter the presence of the glory of God" (cf. Tb 12, 15), who renders many services to Tobit, his son Tobias and his wife Sarah.

The faithful are also conscious of the roles played by the Angels in the life of Jesus: the Angel Gabriel declared to Mary that she would conceive and give birth to the Son of the Most High (cf. Lk 1, 26-38), and that an Angel revealed to Joseph the supernatural origin of Mary's conception (cf. Mt 1, 18-25); the Angels appear to the shepherds in Bethlehem with the news of great joy of the Saviour's birth (cf. Lk 2, 8-24); "the Angel of the Lord" protected the infant Jesus when he was threatened by Herod (cf. Mt 2, 13-20); the Angels ministered to Jesus in the desert (cf. Mt 4, 11) and comforted him in his agony (Lk 22, 43), and to the women gathered at the tomb, they announced that he had risen (cf. Mk 16, 1-8), they appear again at the Ascension, revealing its meaning to the disciples and announcing that "Jesus ...will come back in the same way as you have seen him go" (Acts 1, 11).

The faithful will have well grasped the significance of Jesus' admonition not to despise the least of those who believe in him for "their Angels in heaven are continually in the presence of my Father in heaven" (Mt 10, 10), and the consolation of his assurance that "there is rejoicing among the Angels of God over one repentant sinner" (Lk 15, 10). The faithful also realize that "the Son of man will come in his glory with all his Angels" (mt 25, 31) to judge the living and the dead, and bring history to a close.

215. The Church, which at its outset was saved and protected by the ministry of Angels, and which constantly experiences their "mysterious and powerful assistance"(281), venerates these heavenly spirts and has recourse to their prompt intercession.

During the liturgical year, the Church celebrates the role played by the Holy Angels, in the events of salvation(282) and commemorates them on specific days: 29 September (feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel and Raphael), 2 October (the Guardian Angels). The Church has a votive Mass dedicated to the Holy Angels whose preface proclaims that "the glory of God is reflected in his Angels"(283). In the celebration of the sacred mysteries, the Church associates herself with the angelic hymn and proclaims the thrice holy God (cf. Isaiah 6, 3)(284) invoking their assistance so that the Eucharistic sacrifice "may be taken [to your] altar in heaven, in the presence of [...] divine majesty"(285). The office of lauds is celebrated in their presence (cf. Ps 137, 1)(286). The Church entrusts to the ministry of the Holy Angels (cf. Aps 5, 8; 8, 3) the prayers of the faithful, the contrition of penitents(287), and the protection of the innocent from the assaults of the Malign One(288). The Church implores God to send his Angels at the end of the day to protect the faithful as they sleep(289), prays that the celestial spirits come to the assistance of the faithful in their last agony(290), and in the rite of obsequies, invokes God to send his Angels to accompany the souls of just into paradise(291) and to watch over their graves.

216. Down through the centuries, the faithful have translated into various devotional exercises the teaching of the faith in relation to the ministry of Angels: the Holy Angels have been adopted as patrons of cities and corporations; great shrines in their honour have developed such as Mont-Saint-Michel in Normandy, San Michele della Chiusa in Piemonte and San Michele Gargano in Apulia, each appointed with specific feast days; hymns and devotions to the Holy Angels have also been composed.

Popular piety encompasses many forms of devotion to the Guardian Angels. St. Basil Great (+378) taught that "each and every member of the faithful has a Guardian Angel to protect, guard and guide them through life"(292). This ancient teaching was consolidated by biblical and patristic sources and lies behind many forms of piety. St. Bernard of Clarivaux (+1153) was a great master and a notable promoter of devotion to the Guardian Angels. For him, they were a proof "that heaven denies us nothing that assists us", and hence, "these celestial spirits have been placed at our sides to protect us, instruct us and to guide us"(293).

Devotion to the Holy Angels gives rise to a certain form of the Christian life which is characterized by:

devout gratitude to God for having placed these heavenly spirits of great sanctity and dignity at the service of man;

an attitude of devotion deriving from the knowledge of living constantly in the presence of the Holy Angels of God;- serenity and confidence in facing difficult situations, since the Lord guides and protects the faithful in the way of justice through the ministry of His Holy Angels.Among the prayers to the Guardian Angels the Angele Dei(294) is especially popular, and is often recited by families at morning and evening prayers, or at the recitation of the Angelus.

217. Popular devotion to the Holy Angels, which is legitimate and good, can, however, also give rise to possible deviations:

when, as sometimes can happen, the faithful are taken by the idea that the world is subject to demiurgical struggles, or an incessant battle between good and evil spirits, or Angels and daemons, in which man is left at the mercy of superior forces and over which he is helpless; such cosmologies bear little relation to the true Gospel vision of the struggle to overcome the Devil, which requires moral commitment, a fundamental option for the Gospel, humility and prayer;

when the daily events of life, which have nothing or little to do with our progressive maturing on the journey towards Christ are read schematically or simplistically, indeed childishly, so as to ascribe all setbacks to the Devil and all success to the Guardian Angels. The practice of assigning names to the Holy Angels should be discouraged, except in the cases of Gabriel, Raphael and Michael whose names are contained in Holy Scripture.
According to zenit.org/2015/09/01/assigning-names-to-angels/
"With respect to the naming of the angels, the Latin Church has always been somewhat wary. In a synod or council held in Rome in the year 745 Pope St. Zachary sought to curb a tendency toward angel worship and forbade the use of names not found in Scripture.

A text describing this synod (or council) is reported in Volume XII of Cardinal Cesare Baronio’s “Annali Ecclesiastici” (published 1607). The remarkable and somewhat harsh text of this synod dealt with the supposed heretical teachings of a priest living in Germany called Adalbert. A prayer he had composed included the lines:

“I pray ye and conjure ye, and supplicate myself to ye, angel Uriel, angel Raguel, angel Tubuel, angel Michael, angel Adimis, angel Tubuas, angel Sabaoth, angel Simuel.”

Baronio’s text said, “And when this sacrilegious prayer had been read to the end, the holy Pope Zachary said: How, holy brothers, to you respond to this? The holy bishops and venerable priests responded: What else is to be done, but that all these things that have been read in our presence should be burned in flames; and their authors cast into the chains of anathema? For the eight names of Angels, which Adalbert has invoked in his prayer, are not, excepting Michael, names of Angels, but rather of demons, whom he has invoked to bring aid to himself. But we (as taught by your holy Apostleship), and as divine authority transmits, acknowledge no more than the names of three Angels, that is, Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael. These the Fathers [say]. By whom you perceive that the book called by the vulgate name Fourth Esdras, in which there is frequent mention of the angel Uriel, is rejected and altogether proscribed by the Roman Church.”

In the Latin tradition, Uriel is not named or celebrated or invoked or mentioned but the usage of the name is censured and the cult suppressed.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2021, 09:27:31 PM by Benedict » Logged

PAX
CRUX SANCTI PATRIS BENEDICTI
CRUX SACRA SIT MIHI LUX!
NON DRACO SIT MIHI DUX!
VADE RETRO SATANA!
NUMQUAM SUADE MIHI VANA!
SUNT MALA QUAE LIBAS
IPSE VENENA BIBAS!
All Glory Be To God!
All Praise Be To God!
For God Is Greater Than All Things!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!
eschator83
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2021, 08:44:54 AM »

Welcome, Uriel, thanks for initiating a great thread.  I hope you'll start many more.  I was quite surprised to find many references to Uriel in popular literature, such as Milton, Emerson, Haydn, Longfellow, and well-known Apocalypse such as Peter, Barnabas and more.
On the subject of chaplets and novenas, I struggle with frequent mind-wandering in almost every form of prayer.  A spiritual direct firmly advised me not to be chagrined about MW or even falling asleep in prayer, just to seek the Divine Presence and listen for guidance or revelation.  But almost always I shorten my reading or recitation of chaplets.  I say Hail Mary at least twice a day, but almost never a decade.  My Sacred Heart is abbreviated.
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CyrilSebastian
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« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2021, 05:56:43 PM »

In Jewish traditions Uriel has been identified as the wielder of the fiery sword in driving Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden.   
 
sword fight sword fight sword fight sword fight sword fight sword fight sword fight sword fight sword fight sword fight
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eschator83
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« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2021, 12:21:46 PM »

I find myself recalling your opening remark about sometimes feeling overwhelmed, and the very wise and helpful words of my Spiritual Counselor (she said she liked that title more than Director).  She told me to think of the many forms of Devotions of the Church as a beautiful garden or a wonderful buffet.  She said it would be impossible to enjoy every flower, and I could get very sick if I tried to eat everything.  She suggested following my instinct and the Holy Spirit at my leisure, and I could find the Presence and Will of the Divine Trinity almost anywhere.
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