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Saints' Discussion Forums  |  Forums  |  Saints' & Spiritual Life General Discussion  |  Topic: Contemplation 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Benedict
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« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2022, 06:13:20 PM »

Matthew 6:28 et de vestimento quid solliciti estis considerate lilia agri quomodo crescunt non laborant nec nent
And for raiment why are you solicitous? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they labour not, neither do they spin.

The Greek word for considerate is katamanthanó meaning "I understand, take in a fact about, consider carefully." additional information concerning the word is
katamanthán? (from 2596 /katá, "down to a point, exactly according to," which intensifies 3129 /manthán?, "learn") – properly, thoroughly (exactly) learn; to grasp something conclusively by considering it carefully (AS). It is only used in Mt 6:28.
From kata and manthano; to learn thoroughly, i.e. (by implication) to note carefully -- consider.
Kata can also mean daily or day by day so the phrase can be rendered thus "consider each day or daily consider"
The word for lilies in Greek is krinon, the word used meaning judge is krino

I am just reminded of the Apostle who says 1 Corinthians 11: 31 quod si nosmet ipsos diiudicaremus non utique iudicaremur
But if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged.

Therefore, we are to consider each day and judge ourselves if we are growing. For it is God who gives the growth. If we are not growing, it is because we are resistant to God's grace.
It is easier to condemn oneself for one's own sins and pride and seek pardon from God, than to condemn another and seek judgement against them.
For God gives grace to the humble and shows mercy to the merciful but He rebukes the prideful and punishes the cruel.

Lilies themselves are beautiful and are adorned with precious colors and delightful scents.
The Church is likened to the Lily of the Valley. Thus we may consider each day the Church, and how she grows in number; we may consider her contemplatives who neither labor yet possess a privileged place in the kingdom of God.

Canon Law
Can. 663 §1. The first and foremost duty of all religious is to be: the contemplation of divine things and assiduous union with God in prayer.

Thus the Church has enshrined in its Law the duty of all the religious is the contemplation of divine things and the assiduous union with God in prayer which is the end of every proper mystic.

Can. 652 §1. It is for the director and assistants to discern and test the vocation of the novices and to form them gradually to lead correctly the life of perfection proper to the institute.

§2. Novices are to be led to cultivate human and Christian virtues; through prayer and self-denial they are to be introduced to a fuller way of perfection;
they are to be taught to contemplate the mystery of salvation and to read and meditate on the sacred scriptures;
they are to be prepared to cultivate the worship of God in the sacred liturgy;
they are to learn a manner of leading a life consecrated to God and humanity in Christ through the evangelical counsels;
they are to be instructed regarding the character and spirit, the purpose and discipline, the history and life of the institute;
and they are to be imbued with love for the Church and its sacred pastors.

These 5 noble motives are laid out for the novices of religious orders:
contemplation of the mystery of salvation coupled with meditation on sacred scripture,
cultivation of pious worship of God in the liturgy, to live according to the evangelic councils of perfection,
to adopt the character of the order's founder and the spirit of its vocation and to love the Church and her holy bishops.

Can. 674 Institutes which are entirely ordered to contemplation always hold a distinguished place in the mystical Body of Christ:
for they offer an extraordinary sacrifice of praise to God, illumine the people of God with the richest fruits of holiness, move it by their example, and extend it with hidden apostolic fruitfulness.
For this reason, members of these institutes cannot be summoned to furnish assistance in the various pastoral ministries however much the need of the active apostolate urges it.

Canon Law also enshrines the distinguished position of the contemplative orders versus the active orders.
Their role is considered so indispensable that they may not be drafted to perform active or pastoral work outside of their order.

« Last Edit: February 03, 2022, 07:28:17 PM by Benedict » Logged

PAX
CRUX SANCTI PATRIS BENEDICTI
CRUX SACRA SIT MIHI LUX!
NON DRACO SIT MIHI DUX!
VADE RETRO SATANA!
NUMQUAM SUADE MIHI VANA!
SUNT MALA QUAE LIBAS
IPSE VENENA BIBAS!
All Glory Be To God!
All Praise Be To God!
For God Is Greater Than All Things!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!
Glory to Th
Benedict
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« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2022, 04:44:42 PM »

Reverend Arthur Devine
A manual of Mystical Theology chapter 3 excerpt
"There are various definitions of contemplation given by mystical writers. According to St. Augustine: Contemplation is an agreeable admiration of perspicuous truth. According to St. Bernard: Contemplation is a certain elevation of the mind dwelling or resting upon God and tasting the joys of eternal sweetness. Richard of St. Victor defines it as the free insight of the mind dwelling with admiration on the sights or scenes of wisdom. St. Thomas tells us that contemplation is the simple intuition of Divine truth, and he adds that contemplation terminates in affection or love. From all these definitions it may be gathered that three things are required for contemplation. First, that there be the simple intuition of some Divine truth; secondly, that the intuition be of such clearness as to excite admiration in the mind; thirdly, that the intuition be united with a pleasing affection towards those objects which the soul admires. Having given these conditions, the Rev. F. V. Voss for mulates the following definition: Mystical contemplation is)the elevation of the mind to God and to Divine things, joined with an admiring and loving intuition of the same Divine things. I do not find the admiration given by many authors in the definition, and some hold that it is to be regarded as a property of contemplation rather than as something belonging to its essence. We cannot, however, very well conceive contemplation in its true sense without admiration, which arises from the unusual and extraordinary clearness with which the objects of contemplation are seen by the mind, as also from the manner in which these truths are perceived, not according to the usual manner of human knowledge, but in some way rather after the manner of the Angels."

"Man by intuition can know first principles and revealed truths, and this method may, by the grace of God, become his ordinary way of looking upon the truths of faith.

The contemplation we here speak of is that of the Catholic. It is Divine, mystical, theological, and affective, which enlightens the intellect, and inflames the will in a special and sublime manner, and above the human way of acquiring knowledge by reasoning and inference, so that this contemplation itself is called by a special right mystical theology by pious writers. It is different from philosophical contemplation namely, that by which philosophers, guided by the light of Nature, contemplate God, of Whom St. Paul speaks when he says: When they knew God, they have not glorified Him as God, or given thanks, but became [vain] in their thoughts, and their foolish heart was darkened. [ Rom. i. 21. ] It is also different from purely speculative theology, that by which the theologian, helped by the light of faith, contemplates God, because in the theologian as well as in the philosopher, the contemplation is vain if it only proceeds from curiosity, and rests in the intellect, and is satisfied with knowledge without moving the affections of the heart and will. It is true that contemplation itself is the act of the intellect, yet, in order that it be really fruitful and sanctifying, the will must concur with it in many ways. This it does first as the principle which moves the intellect to contemplate. For the contemplation we speak of proceeds from charity or the love of God, which belongs to the will and is its act. Then, again, charity, or the love of God, is the end of contemplation, and here we have the will concurring with the intellect, directing the contemplation to an increase of charity and union with God. Lastly, we are told by mystical writers that joy and delight are the result of contemplation, or are concomitant with it, and these reside in the will and are its acts."
« Last Edit: May 08, 2022, 06:37:06 PM by Benedict » Logged

PAX
CRUX SANCTI PATRIS BENEDICTI
CRUX SACRA SIT MIHI LUX!
NON DRACO SIT MIHI DUX!
VADE RETRO SATANA!
NUMQUAM SUADE MIHI VANA!
SUNT MALA QUAE LIBAS
IPSE VENENA BIBAS!
All Glory Be To God!
All Praise Be To God!
For God Is Greater Than All Things!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!
Alleluia!
Glory to Th
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