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Saints' Discussion Forums  |  Forums  |  Saints' & Spiritual Life General Discussion  |  Topic: Married, parents, widow/widower Saints and Blesseds 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Bailey2
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« on: June 26, 2010, 11:39:27 AM »

I thought I'd start a thread to put sayings and biographies Saints and Blesseds  who were married, mothers, fathers, widows, widowers (add to Shin's idea  Grin)
I'll start with Elizabeth of Hungary since Patricia's daughter was interested.

Elizabeth of Hungary.  Daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary and Gertrude of Andechs, a sister of St. Hedwig.  Betrothed at the age of 4 to Louis Ludwig IV of Thuringia.  Had a rather complicated childhood because of all the politics.  Married 1221;  Married in 1221 (at the age of 14--wouldn't recommend that now-- but you know people died in their 30's and 40's then so they married early)......... was madly in love with husband....... "elizabeth's marriage was contracted for dynastic reasons and not on the basis of a personal inclination; nevertheless, the marital union was happy beyond all expectations...... she was an extremely warm and affectionate person.........."  She would please her husband by wearing well fitted and wealthy garments becoming of royalty.  When he went on business she would wear wool or a hair shirt covered with the clothes of a widow.  But most of the time she followed him on business at great personal discomfort...... and would pray at night when her husband was asleep.  Her money she used to take care of the poor, even wash their wounds.  Husband was OK with that.  Lots of info re: this marriage.  She was the mother of 3 children.  Six years into the marriage, her husband died of plague while off on the crusades ordered by the pope.  She was completely and deeply shaken, "Now the world and everything in it that I loved is dead."  

Now those extended family in the nobility in the castle never liked her (because she would take care of the poor)...... something very unbecoming of nobility.  So when her husband died she was no longer welcome there.  She snuck away by night......Not sure what happened to her children but it can be assumed they were cared for by nobility.  She died only three years later at  24 yrs old.

"She was canonized in 1235 as an exemplary young wife who had masterfully achieved a unity and harmony between her love for God and her love for both her husband and her children, as well as for the sick and the poor"  (hmm, your daughter picked this Saint to be interested in?  Huh? Grin)

Preface of the Mass for her feast day on Nov 19th reads in part: "For You have endowed her with a great love.  She loved her husband with all the ardor of her heart.  When she lost him in death, she followed the call of the Gospel.  She sold what she had and joyfully gave everything to the poor, who honored her as their mother.  In them she saw Christ, and she wanted to serve Him in the poorest of the poor.  Happy in spite of difficulties, she suffered calumny and injustice; made perfect at a young age, she attained the joys of heaven."
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Patricia
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« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2010, 12:18:41 PM »

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Now those extended family in the nobility in the castle never liked her (because she would take care of the poor)...... something very unbecoming of nobility.  So when her husband died she was no longer welcome there.  She snuck away by night......Not sure what happened to her children but it can be assumed they were cared for by nobility.  She died only three years later at  24 yrs old.

 :'(  What a short and holy life !!
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« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2010, 06:14:23 AM »

I love St. Elizabeth of Hungary Smiley
Antoher married Saint, whose name I took as my Oblate name when I made my profession, is St. Frances of Rome, who was the first to set up a Benedictine Oblate community...I find her story to be very inspiring Little Angel

    One of the greatest mystics of the fifteenth century; born at Rome, of a noble family, in 1384; died there, 9 March, 1440.

    Her youthful desire was to enter religion, but at her father's wish she married, at the age of twelve, Lorenzo de' Ponziani. Among her children we know of Battista, who carried on the family name, Evangelista, a child of great gifts (d. 1411), and Agnes (d. 1413). Frances was remarkable for her charity to the poor, and her zeal for souls. She won away many Roman ladies from a life of frivolity, and united them in an association of oblates attached to the White Benedictine monastery of Santa Maria Nuova; later they became the Benedictine Oblate Congregation of Tor di Specchi (25 March, 1433) which was approved by Eugene IV (4 July, 1433). Its members led the life of religious, but without the strict cloister or formal vows, and gave themselves up to prayer and good works. With her husband's consent Frances practiced continency, and advanced in a life of contemplation. Her visions often assumed the form of drama enacted for her by heavenly personages. She had the gift of miracles and ecstasy, we well as the bodily vision of her guardian angel, had revelations concerning purgatory and hell, and foretold the ending of the Western Schism. She could read the secrets of consciences and detect plots of diabolical origin. She was remarkable for her humility and detachment, her obedience and patience, exemplified on the occasion of her husband's banishment, the captivity of Battista, her sons' death, and the loss of all her property.

    On the death of her husband (1436) she retired among her oblates at Tor di Specchi, seeking admission for charity's sake, and was made superior. On the occasion of a visit to her son, she fell ill and died on the day she had foretold. Her canonization was preceded by three processes (1440, 1443, 1451) and Paul V declared her a saint on 9 May, 1608, assigning 9 March as her feast day. Long before that, however, the faithful were wont to venerate her body in the church of Santa Maria Nuova in the Roman Forum, now known as the church of Santa Francesca Romana.

I love how in Catholicism you can add more names to your baptismal name! My confirmation name is Therese and my Oblate name is Frances Grin
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Bailey2
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« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2010, 10:29:16 AM »

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She was remarkable for her humility and detachment, her obedience and patience, exemplified on the occasion of her husband's banishment, the captivity of Battista, her sons' death, and the loss of all her property.

This in itself is amazing.  I have nightmares of my sons' deaths or serious injury due to the driving thing.  I can't imagine that kind of detachment!

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Shin
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« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2010, 10:42:00 AM »

I love St. Elizabeth of Hungary Smiley
Antoher married Saint, whose name I took as my Oblate name when I made my profession, is St. Frances of Rome, who was the first to set up a Benedictine Oblate community...I find her story to be very inspiring Little Angel

    One of the greatest mystics of the fifteenth century; born at Rome, of a noble family, in 1384; died there, 9 March, 1440.

    Her youthful desire was to enter religion, but at her father's wish she married, at the age of twelve, Lorenzo de' Ponziani. Among her children we know of Battista, who carried on the family name, Evangelista, a child of great gifts (d. 1411), and Agnes (d. 1413). Frances was remarkable for her charity to the poor, and her zeal for souls. She won away many Roman ladies from a life of frivolity, and united them in an association of oblates attached to the White Benedictine monastery of Santa Maria Nuova; later they became the Benedictine Oblate Congregation of Tor di Specchi (25 March, 1433) which was approved by Eugene IV (4 July, 1433). Its members led the life of religious, but without the strict cloister or formal vows, and gave themselves up to prayer and good works. With her husband's consent Frances practiced continency, and advanced in a life of contemplation. Her visions often assumed the form of drama enacted for her by heavenly personages. She had the gift of miracles and ecstasy, we well as the bodily vision of her guardian angel, had revelations concerning purgatory and hell, and foretold the ending of the Western Schism. She could read the secrets of consciences and detect plots of diabolical origin. She was remarkable for her humility and detachment, her obedience and patience, exemplified on the occasion of her husband's banishment, the captivity of Battista, her sons' death, and the loss of all her property.

    On the death of her husband (1436) she retired among her oblates at Tor di Specchi, seeking admission for charity's sake, and was made superior. On the occasion of a visit to her son, she fell ill and died on the day she had foretold. Her canonization was preceded by three processes (1440, 1443, 1451) and Paul V declared her a saint on 9 May, 1608, assigning 9 March as her feast day. Long before that, however, the faithful were wont to venerate her body in the church of Santa Maria Nuova in the Roman Forum, now known as the church of Santa Francesca Romana.

I love how in Catholicism you can add more names to your baptismal name! My confirmation name is Therese and my Oblate name is Frances Grin

Ahh! Those are great names! I have a great grandmother of that name! .. Frances Therese.. Very good together!

Detachment helps us to love! If we are too attached we cannot love properly, because the love is too much of ourselves!  Cheesy An attached mother would get too upset about some things, but a detached one would not let that stop her from doing what is most good for her children! It may seem as if it's less love, but what it actually is, is best love! A detached father can discipline his son, an attached one becomes too upset at his son's failings to deal with them properly!  Cheesy
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Bailey2
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« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2010, 06:14:50 PM »

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Detachment helps us to love! If we are too attached we cannot love properly, because the love is too much of ourselves!  Cheesy An attached mother would get too upset about some things, but a detached one would not let that stop her from doing what is most good for her children! It may seem as if it's less love, but what it actually is, is best love

Right you are Shin........ but try being a mother!  

Incidentally, a tid-bit about my Elizabeth Seton.  When the archbishop of Baltimore gave her the rule for the sisters of charity that he wanted her to start, she declined because there was no provision for her children (no documentation saying children could reside with the sisters) or a statement that other widows with children could enter the new order.  (you know of course there were financial reasons to not include this on the Church's part.  Most of the widows starting orders were taken care of financially by the Church, a good alternative to poverty---- oops, too pragmatic, I know---- but God blends need with holy desire, you know).  Anyway, Elizabeth was very forceful about this and the good archbishop had to modify the rule before she would agree to start the order!  She simply said, "I am a mother to my children first."   that was that!
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Bailey2
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« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2010, 04:46:25 PM »

From St. Jane Chantal; a widow to her daughter, a new widow
   “My greatest wish is that you live like a true Christian widow, unpretentious in your dress and actions, and especially reserved in your relationships, having nothing to do with vain, worldly young men.”

   “Please trust me in this, for your honor and mine, as well as for my peace of mind.  I know very well, darling, of course, that we can’t live in the world without enjoying some of its pleasures, but take my word for it dearest, you won’t find any really lasting joys except in God, in living virtuously, raising your children well, looking after their affairs and managing your household.  If you seek happiness elsewhere, you will experience much anguish, as I well know.”
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Patricia
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« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2010, 04:57:59 PM »

Very good advice by St. Jane Chantal.   Little Angel
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« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2010, 09:24:56 PM »

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Detachment helps us to love! If we are too attached we cannot love properly, because the love is too much of ourselves!  Cheesy An attached mother would get too upset about some things, but a detached one would not let that stop her from doing what is most good for her children! It may seem as if it's less love, but what it actually is, is best love

Right you are Shin........ but try being a mother!  

Incidentally, a tid-bit about my Elizabeth Seton.  When the archbishop of Baltimore gave her the rule for the sisters of charity that he wanted her to start, she declined because there was no provision for her children (no documentation saying children could reside with the sisters) or a statement that other widows with children could enter the new order.  (you know of course there were financial reasons to not include this on the Church's part.  Most of the widows starting orders were taken care of financially by the Church, a good alternative to poverty---- oops, too pragmatic, I know---- but God blends need with holy desire, you know).  Anyway, Elizabeth was very forceful about this and the good archbishop had to modify the rule before she would agree to start the order!  She simply said, "I am a mother to my children first."   that was that!


There isn't any such thing as too pragmatic. That's like saying a woman is too pregnant. I think God is super pragmatic. Look at the intricacy of the human body or of any part of Creation.
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